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Last Updated: Monday, 6 June, 2005, 23:00 GMT 00:00 UK
Experts air car pollution fears
Car exhaust
Pollution levels have risen in several parts of the UK
Medical experts have called on car manufacturers to control the level of pollutants produced by diesel engines.

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) said levels of PM10 particles were still rising in many places.

These areas included Glasgow, which recorded the third highest figures in the UK. The two top areas were Marylebone Road and Camden in London.

The World Health Organisation has said there is no safe limit for exposure to PM10, which can affect breathing.

The highly toxic pollutant is produced by diesel engines.

The CSP raised concerns about levels earlier this year, and said its latest monitoring had shown no significant reduction.

The health consequences for people with lung diseases like asthma and emphysema can lead ultimately to a premature death
Grahame Pope
Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

The highest reading in Scotland was at a kerbside in Glasgow, where the figure had increased to 34 micrograms per cubic metre of air - an increase of seven micrograms since last year.

Other Scottish blackspots included parts of Edinburgh and Aberdeen.

The society called for all vehicle manufacturers to fit special filters as standard, arguing that the technology was proven and was already being used by Mercedes-Benz.

The CSP's Grahame Pope said: "Poor air quality can cause wheezing and shortness of breath.

"The health consequences for people with lung diseases like asthma and emphysema can lead ultimately to a premature death."

He said the government should consider legislation to tighten the standards for diesel cars.


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