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Last Updated: Monday, 2 May, 2005, 13:45 GMT 14:45 UK
Art scheme for 'culturally poor'
Open book
Writers will be involved in some of the projects
Artists are being installed in communities across Scotland as part of a 1.4m project to enrich what have been dubbed "culture-poor" areas.

Details of the lottery-funded scheme were unveiled by the culture minister at the Arches venue in Glasgow.

It will take part in the Partners initiative by hosting a circus workshop for pupils at 30 of the city's schools.

One of the other projects will bring urban music and street poetry to rural communities in Angus and Aberdeenshire.

Three artists will work with pupils at four secondary schools in the area.

Like most brilliant ideas, it's simple but offers a genuine opportunity to change lives
Richard Holloway
Scottish Arts Council chairman

Also in the north east, a group in Aberdeen will help set up a community-led internet channel.

In West Dunbartonshire a writer, graphic artist and web designer will teach children and young people how to write, illustrate and electronically publish their own stories.

A writer will work with refugees and asylum seekers in Glasgow's newly-formed Artists in Exile group, while there are also efforts to build on the success of the city's Hidden Gardens project at the Tramway.

A hard-to-let house in Clackmannanshire will be transformed into a new Art House, which will become the base for a writer/storyteller and a centre for arts activity.

Social exclusion

In the neighbouring Stirling Council area a musician in residence at the Tollbooth will work with primary school pupils and their parents, a homeless persons' centre and a youth club in the Raploch area.

Under the Drake Music Project, a musician will work with the Antonine Court centre for adults with disabilities towards a performance of swing-time music with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra.

Scottish Arts Council chairman Richard Holloway, said research into social exclusion had shown that people in deprived areas were "not only money-poor, they are culture-poor".

Partners is a significant and imaginative step forward, building on work that is happening across Scotland's communities to address barriers to participation in cultural activity
Patricia Ferguson
Culture Minister

"Since the culture-poor find it almost impossible to access the transforming possibilities of art, art has decided to come to them.

"Like most brilliant ideas, it's simple but offers a genuine opportunity to change lives."

Culture Minister Patricia Ferguson said: "The arts can boost young people's educational and creative achievements and play a big part in increasing self-worth and self-confidence.

"They also play a significant part in regenerating economically disadvantaged areas and communities.

"Partners is a significant and imaginative step forward, building on work that is happening across Scotland's communities to address barriers to participation in cultural activity."


SEE ALSO:
Music industry 'deserves backing'
17 Mar 05 |  Scotland
Culture report hails 'optimism'
04 Nov 04 |  Scotland
Authors back writers' city plan
24 Aug 04 |  Scotland
Opening day for gallery project
04 Aug 04 |  Scotland


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