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Last Updated: Friday, 2 December 2005, 16:22 GMT
Cities' plans to tackle disorder
Bouncer - generic
A 'Nite Zone' has been created in Glasgow city centre
Two cities have introduced late night measures in a bid to reduce the risk of disorder.

Glasgow City Council has created a "Nite Zone" around Central Station while taxi marshals have been introduced in Aberdeen.

In Glasgow, more CCTV cameras, improved lighting and better bus information were due to be provided from Friday.

Taxi marshals have been recruited to patrol ranks in Aberdeen in the hope of cutting drink-related crime.

The marshals were due to be deployed at ranks around the city's Union Street area from this weekend, with the aim of preventing queue-jumping and any subsequent disorder.

When taxi ranks feel safer, more people will take a taxi instead of walking home in the early hours
Martin Greig
Aberdeen Community Safety Partnership

They have no powers of arrest but have been equipped with radios, enabling them to contact police.

The project has been set up by Aberdeen Community Safety Partnership, which includes representatives from Aberdeen City Council, Grampian Police and Aberdeen City Centre Partnership.

Plans to employ the marshals last Christmas were postponed after the private contractor providing them withdrew at the last minute.

Martin Greig, chairman of the safety partnership, said the marshals would provide a reassuring presence for late night revellers.

'Lack of powers'

He said: "When taxi ranks feel safer, more people will take a taxi instead of walking home in the early hours, often some distance and in a potentially vulnerable state."

However, Derek Smith, of the Aberdeen Taxi Group, said: "We are a bit apprehensive about whether it will work or not because of the lack of powers.

We want people not just to have a good night out in Glasgow, but also have easy access to bus and taxi transport home
Jim Coleman
Glasgow City Council

"I feel that the money that is being spent on this may have been better invested in CCTV cameras or getting actual police officers to patrol the ranks."

Meanwhile, the three-month Glasgow "Nite Zone" has been created by the council to help revellers get home as quickly and safely as possible while preventing anti-social behaviour.

If the pilot scheme proves successful it could be extended to other parts of the city.

About 50,000 pocket bus guides detailing late services have also been published.

Taxi sign
Taxi ranks in Aberdeen will be patrolled by marshals

These services, if they take in Union Street or Hope Street, stop at illuminated 'Nite Zone' bus stops. Help points have also been provided.

The pilot, created by Glasgow City Council in partnership with First Group and Strathclyde Police, has been scheduled to run until February.

The area covered stretches from Gordon Street to Broomielaw and Union Street/Jamaica Street and Oswald Street/Hope Street.

Extra litter bins have also been provided and, where possible, graffiti and fly posting removed. More police officers have been promised.

Councillor Jim Coleman said: "We want people not just to have a good night out in Glasgow, but also have easy access to bus and taxi transport home.

"We'll be monitoring the use of the 'Nite Zone' to see if it makes leaving the city after a night out any easier in the area. If it works, we'd look to extending it to other parts of the city."




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