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Last Updated: Wednesday, 23 February, 2005, 22:30 GMT
Marches may be banned in Glasgow
Orange march
More than 300 marches take place in Glasgow each year
Marches could be banned in Glasgow if they have been the focus of public disorder in the past.

Under new plans they could be blocked if sectarian chants, threatening or drunken behaviour, or support for proscribed organisations has occurred.

The authority said other options included re-routing processions or bolstering stewarding arrangements.

Glasgow City Council agreed the policy on Orange and Republican parades after considering a police report.

Former Strathclyde chief constable Sir John Orr came up with the recommendations and suggested marches be blocked if there was a risk of intimidation to the local community or of serious disruption.

The new policy will make it clear to those who organise and participate that the event should be pre-planned, well-organised and peaceful, with as little negative impact on local residents and communities
Jim Coleman
Glasgow City Council

Under the measures, groups will have to give 28 days' notice of a march, instead of the present seven.

They may also be ordered to pay a good behaviour bond, which will be forfeited if marchers cause trouble.

In future, city leaders will decide whether to give the 300-plus parades which take place in Glasgow every year the green light following advice from police and consultation with residents and businesses.

Council chiefs will also consider the frequency of processions in a particular area, their timing and the route before granting approval.

The council's deputy leader, Jim Coleman, said: "We're looking to implement the new policy over the summer and we hope to get the full co-operation of those individuals and organisations who arrange processions and demonstrations in Glasgow.

"The new policy will make it clear to those who organise and participate that the event should be pre-planned, well-organised and peaceful, with as little negative impact on local residents and communities."

'Zero-tolerance'

The policy followed a public consultation which attracted 3,680 responses, 95% of which came from people associated with the Grand Orange Lodge of Scotland.

The organisation's executive officer, Robert McLean, said: "We have zero-tolerance for proscribed organisations and we encourage the police to be robust in tackling those people who support these groups at marches."

But Cairde Na hEireann (Friends of Ireland), which organises Republican marches in Scotland, was defiant.

Spokesman Jim Slaven said: "No-one can stop the Friends of Ireland marching or expressing support for political organisations."


SEE ALSO:
Orangemen aim for 'touchy, feely'
19 Jun 04 |  Scotland
Parades adviser to be appointed
15 Jun 04 |  Scotland
Marching to different tunes
10 Jul 03 |  Scotland
Republican march banned
24 Jan 03 |  Scotland
McConnell concern over march
23 Jan 03 |  Scotland
Scots must 'unite' to beat bigotry
05 Dec 02 |  Scotland
Tackling bigotry: the proposals
05 Dec 02 |  Scotland


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