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Last Updated: Saturday, 5 February, 2005, 18:49 GMT
Toll supporters' last-minute push
Congestion charge sign
Edinburgh is seeking to follow the London charging route
Activists who back controversial plans for congestion charging in Edinburgh have taken to the streets in a last-minute bid to garner support.

Supporters from the Get Edinburgh Moving lobby group handed out leaflets ahead of Monday's ballot on the plans.

'Yes' campaigners claim they will mean less traffic, cleaner air and better public transport.

However, 'No' campaigners warn the charging will hit the economy without delivering the promised benefits.

Pro-charging campaigners on the streets of the capital included students, political activists and green groups.

The plans for a congestion charge are being put to Edinburgh residents in a postal ballot which will run from 7-21 February.

As many as 300,000 papers have been sent out and residents have two weeks to return them.

On the ballot paper residents will be asked whether or not they support the council's preferred strategy, which centres on road tolls.

Increased transport investment will be funded by the income and the scheme involves a once-a-day charge of 2.

There will be two cordons from Monday to Friday made up of an outer one for the morning rush hour and an inner one until 1830 at night.

It is not a statutory election, so the City of Edinburgh Council does not have access to the full electoral register.

Cars waiting at lights
The plans have become a major issue in the city and beyond

However, the local authority believes 88% of voters will be eligible.

Three councils have gone to court to challenge the controversial plans.

Fife, West Lothian and Midlothian councils challenged before Lord Brodie an exemption for some residents in outlying parts of the capital.

They said motorists living just as close to the city in neighbouring councils will have to pay.

The judicial review was heard over Thursday and Friday and Lord Brodie is expected to give a written judgement at a later date.

The council has argued it is reasonable for it to decide whether residents living outside the outer cordon of the scheme should be exempt from the charge.

The result is expected to be available on 22 February and will go before a full council meeting on Thursday, 24 February.

INNER CORDON ENTRY POINTS
1a. Glenogle Road
2. Brandon Terrace
4. Eyre Place
5. Cornwallis Place
6. Mansfield Place
7. East London Street
8. Leith Walk
10a. Regent Terrace
11. Regent Road
12. Calton Road
13. Canongate
14. Holyrood Road
15. St Leonard's Street
16. Clerk Street
17. Hope Park Crescent
18. Melville Drive
21. Home Street
22. Dundee Street
23a. West Approach Road (Dundee Street access)
23b. West Approach Road (Westfield Road access)
24. Dalry Road
25. Roseburn Terrace
26. Belford Road
28a. Randolph Cliff
30. Deanhaugh Street

OUTER CORDON ENTRY POINTS
1. A199 Edinburgh Road
2. A1 Musselburgh By-pass
3. A6095 Newcraighall Road
4. Whitehill Road
5. A6106 The Wisp
6. A7 Old Dalkeith Road
7. A772 Drum Street
8. Lasswade Road
9a. A701 Burdiehouse Road
9b. Southhouse Broadway
10. A702 Biggar Road
11. Dreghorn Link
12. A70 Lanark Road
13. Baberton Junction
14. A71 Calder Road
14a. Edinburgh Park South Access
15. South Gyle Broadway
16. A8 Glasgow Road
17. A90n Queensferry Road




SEE ALSO:
Court considers congestion charge
03 Feb 05 |  Scotland
Congestion plan: 'The only way'
02 Feb 05 |  Scotland
Congestion plan: 'A double noose'
02 Feb 05 |  Scotland


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