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Last Updated: Tuesday, 18 January, 2005, 06:39 GMT
Housing delayed by poor sewerage
Water workers
Developments are being delayed because of poor infrastructure
Hundreds of new houses and industrial developments in Glasgow are being held up because of the city's decaying water and sewerage infrastructure.

A report due before Glasgow City Council on Tuesday identifies about 150 prospective housing developments which are being hampered.

The problems could cost as much as 1bn to sort out, it warns.

Other sites affected include 48 industrial schemes, a business park development and rented accommodation.

A report due before the council's policy and resources committee claims anything less than a substantial increase in investment would hinder the momentum of Glasgow's regeneration.

Better drinking water

Scottish Water says 1.8bn of investment was allocated across Scotland between 2002 and 2006, mainly to deliver better drinking water and to clean up beaches.

About 240m of that is being spent to relieve development constraints across Scotland.

In September last year, the council agreed to help pay for improvements to the ageing sewage network in the east end of the city with funds of up to 4.5m.

It said water and drainage were not its responsibility, but the regeneration of the east end was being held up by a lack of capacity.




SEE ALSO:
Council bails out Scottish Water
08 Sep 04 |  Scotland
Views wanted on water services
20 Jul 04 |  Scotland
Sewerage 'hampers planning hopes'
25 Jun 04 |  Scotland
Water watchdog reform in pipeline
23 Apr 04 |  Scotland


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