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Last Updated: Monday, 22 November, 2004, 10:50 GMT
JFK shooting game provokes anger
JFK Reloaded
Players target the president's motorcade
A Scottish firm has been criticised by the family of John F Kennedy for producing a game which recreates the president's assassination in Dallas.

"JFK Reloaded" was released on Monday to coincide with the 41st anniversary of the president's assassination.

David Smith, a spokesman for Senator Ted Kennedy, the brother of JFK, said the PC-based game was "despicable".

A spokesman for Traffic Games said it was encouraging youngsters to take an interest in history.

The Stirling-based company argued that the game was aimed at disproving theories that a conspiracy, rather than lone gunman Lee Harvey Oswald, was responsible for the assassination.

What we are hoping to do is re-ignite people's passion for history
Kirk Ewing
Computer game creator

The creators said they had written to Senator Kennedy before the release of the game, which allows players to simulate the shooting.

Kirk Ewing, company managing director and a former documentary film maker, said he understood that some people would be horrified at the game but went on: "We have an enormous respect for the Kennedy family.

Kennedy with his wife Jackie and daughter Caroline
The Kennedy family is upset by the video game
"What we are hoping to do is re-ignite people's passion for history. This is a unique insight into the assassination. We think there's a whole generation of people who have no experience of the Kennedy assassination.

"The game is effectively a reconstruction of the event using video game technology.

"I hasten to add that we don't regard it as a video game because there's no imagination been used to create the scene."

Mr Ewing said: "It's been covered in every kind of media so far, whether in books or movies, so what we've done is really just to extend that into the interactive media."

The game footage that caused the controversy

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