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Last Updated: Monday, 18 August, 2003, 09:14 GMT 10:14 UK
Slug's trail to silver screen
by Stephanie Todd
BBC News Online Scotland

While the 1932 ruling in the Donoghue v Stevenson case remains the starting point for many negligence actions around the world, it is also the first port of call for many students training for a career in law.

Cafe site
A plaque marks the spot where the cafe once stood
Such is the popularity of the story, students now enjoy a Hollywood-style film of the case, as well as poring over copies of the original legal papers.

The "Paisley Snail" video was the brainchild of three Canadian men - two top lawyers and a film maker.

Martin Taylor, a retired justice of the British Columbia Court of Appeal, David Hay, a litigator in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Michael Doherty, a film producer and editor, came together to produce a comprehensive teaching guide based on the case.

Through narration, re-enactment, interviews and still photography, the film takes a sometimes tongue-in-cheek look at the case and its significance.

It is now shown at a number of universities around the world from Glasgow to British Columbia, Singapore and Hong Kong.

The film has also been screened at the Commonwealth Law Conference in Vancouver and at the Australian Legal Convention in Melbourne.

It is not just the legal community that has a deep interest in the Paisley case.

As an old-style drinks manufacturer we wanted to do something fun to mark what really was a turning point, not just for the legal world, but for the manufacturing one too
Fentimans
A Newcastle-based drink manufacturer has marked the slug's 75th anniversary by running a competition in its honour.

Ginger beer firm Fentimans printed special labels on its beverage bottles encouraging consumers to answer two simple questions on where the slug was found and when the event took place.

The prize on offer is 7,400 - today's value of Ms Donoghue's damages award.

Owner Eldon Robson revealed the firm had received thousands of entries.

He said: "We also asked our customers to write in with quirky captions as to why they would not be likely to find a snail in their ginger beer today.

"We had had a massive response with many weird and wonderful suggestions and are currently sifting through the entries with a view to finding a winner which will be announced at the end of this month to coincide with the anniversary of the famous slug appearing."

He added: "As an old-style drinks manufacturer we wanted to do something fun to mark what really was a turning point, not just for the legal world, but for the manufacturing one too."




SEE ALSO:
The slug that changed the world
18 Aug 03  |  Scotland
How the law changed
18 Aug 03  |  Scotland
May owes fame to slug
18 Aug 03  |  Scotland


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