BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
    You are in: UK: Scotland  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
 Friday, 24 January, 2003, 18:41 GMT
Republican march banned
Republican march - generic
The march was due to take place on Saturday
Permission has been withdrawn for a controversial republican march through the first minister's constituency to commemorate Bloody Sunday.

A hastily convened council meeting on Friday evening considered new information from the police that trouble could break out during the march.

Strathclyde Police said the force had received intelligence indicating a threat of serious disorder and violence.

The march was scheduled to take place at 0930 GMT on Saturday in Wishaw.

Chief Superintendent Tom Buchan
It is the view of Strathclyde Police that systematic and organised violence is likely

Chief Superintendent
Tom Buchan
Chief Superintendent Tom Buchan said the force had received "significant, specific and reliable new information which indicates there is a significant threat of serious disorder, violence and damage to property with an attendant threat to public safety".

"This information also indicates that both supporters of and objectors to the march are equally at risk and those confrontations may not be confined to one specific location in Wishaw," he said.

"The threat to public order is from organised groups and individuals from across Scotland who have the capacity to mobilise and act in a concerted manner.

"As a result it is the view of Strathclyde Police that systematic and organised violence is likely."

The council has now withdrawn permission for the parade to take place.

A spokesman for Jack McConnell said that the first minister believed the decision was right if it was taken with public safety as the prime concern.

'Ban outrageous'

The West of Scotland Bands Association said it was furious with the decision, which it warned was only storing up trouble for the future.

Spokesman Jim Slavin described the ban as outrageous.

On Thursday North Lanarkshire councillors said they had no power to block the march without information that it posed a threat to public order.

The same group of councillors reconvened for fresh discussions in the light of the information from the police.

Councillor Jim McKinlay said the new information was key to their decision.

"That evidence indicated the police could no longer ensure public safety and we feel that was paramount and therefore we had to revoke the decision taken yesterday," he said.

  WATCH/LISTEN
  ON THIS STORY
  BBC Scotland's Aileen Clarke
"The decision was taken to withdraw permission for the march"
See also:

23 Jan 03 | Scotland
05 Dec 02 | Scotland
05 Dec 02 | Scotland
03 Dec 02 | Scotland
16 Oct 02 | Scotland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Scotland stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Scotland stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes