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 Tuesday, 31 December, 2002, 07:38 GMT
Recognition for ex-prisons watchdog
The outspoken former head of Scotland's prisons inspectorate has vowed to seek a new role in public life as it emerged that he has been honoured by the Queen.

Clive Fairweather, who left the role of chief prisons inspector this year, has been made a CBE in recognition of his years of service but said he would not be retiring.

Mr Fairweather, 58, praised the work of "hard-pressed" prison staff and governors and said he still had "bags of energy" left, following his eight years in post.

Clive Fairweather
Clive Fairweather: Outspoken views
The former Special Air Service (SAS) officer, who lives with his son and daughter in East Lothian, was praised by prison chiefs, unions and politicians of all parties when his third and final term came to an end in October.

Mr Fairweather was succeeded by former Moderator of the Church of Scotland General Assembly Andrew McLellan after his application for a fourth term was turned down.

During his tenure as chief inspector, Mr Fairweather often hit the headlines because of his hard-hitting reports and views on issues including slopping-out, overcrowding, drug-taking and working conditions in Scotland's jails.

Speaking after news of his honour emerged, he said: "I'm very pleased that the work of the prison inspectorate has been recognised and I hope there will be other awards to follow.

"I also hope prison bosses are looking after hard-pressed prison staff and governors as well."

He added: "I've still got bags of energy in me, and I want to continue serving the public as I have done since I was 17."

Mr Fairweather was second in command of the SAS at the time of the Iranian embassy siege in 1980.

He has admitted to being surprised at how his views became more liberal when he witnessed life inside Scotland's prisons.

See also:

31 Dec 02 | Scotland
19 Nov 02 | Scotland
27 Oct 02 | Scotland
04 Sep 02 | Scotland
22 Jul 02 | Scotland
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