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Thursday, 5 December, 2002, 15:29 GMT
Drink-drive ban for 'human distillery'
Police breathalyser -  generic
Mr Harvey was stopped twice by police
A man who alleged that his liver produced alcohol has admitted drink-driving - after being stopped by police a second time.

Douglas Harvey also dropped his attempt to prove that he was a human distillery when he appeared at Perth Sheriff Court.

As he left court the former ship's captain said he had no plans to drive again.

Harvey admitted driving on the A9 in November last year while almost four times over the legal drink limit.


He did provide two breath specimens, but he was told he was blowing too hard

Iain Paterson
Defence solicitor
He had previously denied the charge and argued that a liver problem was responsible for producing the alcohol in his system.

However, the 48-year-old changed his plea on Thursday - and also admitted driving the wrong way down a one-way street in Perth on 18 October.

Harvey, of Fordell Road, Glenrothes, also admitted driving without insurance and failing to give a breath test.

Solicitor Iain Paterson said his client had taken the car because he was worried about the standard of his elderly mother's driving.

"He felt that it would be safer for all concerned if he took the car to a place where she couldn't use it," he said.

Driving ban

"He thought it was a responsible act. His view is that he would not have been over the limit at the time.

"He did provide two breath specimens, but he was told he was blowing too hard."

Harvey was banned from driving for five years and fined a total of 450.


Anyone with that level of alcohol must be on the point of collapse

Sheriff John Newall
In relation to the earlier charge, Harvey - who is now unemployed - had originally claimed that he only drank one whisky and a half pint of beer three hours before he was stopped.

Solicitor Lindy Gill, who appeared initially for Harvey, said her client's liver reacted "abnormally".

"As a result of this, instead of ridding the body of alcohol as it's supposed to, it actually generates alcohol," she said.

However, when asked about the reading on Thursday, Mr Paterson said his client now accepted it was accurate.

Sheriff John Newall told him: "You were driving with approaching four times the quantity of alcohol which is permitted by law.

'Quiet pint'

"Anyone in that situation is a considerable danger to themselves and to the public.

"Anyone with that level of alcohol must be on the point of collapse."

After the court appearance Harvey donned a See You Jimmy hat and told reporters he was going for "a nice quiet pint".

He said: "My liver was producing alcohol, but it's not now.

"For the first time in 15 years my liver is clear. I have had it double checked.

"I pled guilty because I was wrong. I don't intend to drive again."

See also:

24 May 02 | Scotland
08 Mar 02 | Scotland
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