BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Scotland  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 3 December, 2002, 11:15 GMT
56m protects sinking rail route
East Coast rail line
Collapsed mine workings have caused the problem
A major project to upgrade a section of the East Coast Main Line will cost 56m, according to Network Rail.

The rail track company also confirmed a diversion of the line, at Dolphingstone, East Lothian, will be completed by May 2003.

The development covers 1.8 kilometres of track and bypasses old mine workings, some of which date back to the early 18th century.

The track company has reached an agreement with the train operators to ensure that the work is carried out at times that will minimise disruption to passengers.

East coast main line
The line runs for 632km
It links Edinburgh and London
It carries 1,900 passenger and 250 freight trains per day
Current projections are for a 40-50% rise in passenger traffic
Train operator GNER is spending 39m to improve diesel and electric services
Network Rail's head of investment Jim Bellington said: "This is one of the largest railway engineering projects of its type in the UK.

"We currently have some 200 engineers staff working on the site.

"Network Rail is committed to providing a safe and reliable rail network.

"Safety has to be our number one priority and we acted immediately after issues were identified at Dolphingstone which could have threatened the integrity of this key cross border route."

'Minimum inconvenience'

Bill Ure, secretary of the Rail Passenger Council in Scotland, said: "We are very pleased with the progress of this multi-million pound project.

"It will ensure that passenger and freight services continue on the east coast main line with the minimum of inconvenience during the engineering work."

Passengers are being advised to contact train operators or contact National Rail Enquiries for information about potential delays.

Rail line inspection
Engineering checks revealed the extent of the problem
Network Rail said more than 75% of the 1,860 concrete piles required for the operation are in place.

They will support three giant concrete slabs of 340 metres, 328m and 200m in length, which will form the basis of the new railway line.

News of the problem emerged in March this year when a 20mph speed limit was imposed.

Mines once played a large part in the economy of East Lothian.

In Edinburgh itself, an inquiry last year into land subsidence last year concluded that collapses in 200-year-old mine workings were to blame.

The problem, which first appeared in the capital's Ferniehill area last autumn, spread to Moredun Park and homes in the Gilmerton area.

See also:

25 Mar 02 | Scotland
30 Jul 01 | Scotland
04 Jul 00 | Scotland
22 Mar 01 | Scotland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Scotland stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Scotland stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes