BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Scotland  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 30 October, 2002, 14:24 GMT
Army payroll killer's sentence cut
Andrew Walker
Andrew Walker gunned down three Army colleagues
One of Scotland's most notorious murderers has had his sentence cut by three years at the Court of Appeal.

Royal Scots corporal Andrew Walker killed three Army colleagues in a payroll robbery in 1985.

He gunned the three men down with a submachine gun after they had picked up the 19,000 payroll for Glencorse barracks in Penicuik, Midlothian.

Their bodies were found in the Pentland Hills.


A person who could bring himself to do what he did is not fit to live in a society which still regards itself as civilised

Trial judge Lord Grieve

The money was never recovered and it is thought to be buried in the hills.

Walker was found guilty of murder and jailed for life.

The judge, Lord Grieve, recommended that Walker should serve at least 30 years for the murders.

In a report, not previously made public, the judge said: "A person who could bring himself to do what he did is not fit to live in a society which still regards itself as civilised."

"This was a calculated crime. The accused, if he was to achieve his purpose, had to kill.

"I am quite satisfied that the crime was carefully planned, and I am also quite sure that the substance of the evidence given by Walker was a tissue of lies," said Lord Grieve.

He said he felt compelled to make a recommendation in Walker's case because the brutal offences were committed with "a callous disregard for human life".

'Exceptional gravity'

Under new rules, introduced under the European Convention on Human Rights, all murderers must be given a specified "punishment period" within a life sentence.

At the end of the period, the inmate becomes eligible for parole, but may be kept in custody if it is considered necessary for public safety.

At a hearing earlier this year, Walker's punishment period was fixed at 30 years by Lord Reed, who said the victims "were effectively executed" and that the murders were of "exceptional gravity".

Walker, 48, appeared at the High Court in Edinburgh to appeal against the ruling.

Punishment period

His lawyer, Gordon Jackson QC, said 30 years was "excessive" when compared to similar cases such as Howard Wilson, who shot dead two policemen and Robert Mone, who killed a policeman after escaping from the State Hospital at Carstairs.

Wilson's punishment period was set at 25 years.

Mone, who had already murdered before being detained in the State Hospital, also had his punishment period set at 25 years.

Appeal judges ruled that Walker should serve 27 years.

Walker now has 10 years left in prison before the parole board decides on his release.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
Morag Kinniburgh reports
"Walker has 10 years before he is eligible for parole."
See also:

01 Jul 02 | Scotland
09 Sep 02 | Scotland
25 Feb 02 | Scotland
01 Oct 01 | Scotland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Scotland stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Scotland stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes