BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Scotland  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Monday, 14 October, 2002, 14:04 GMT 15:04 UK
Advocates keen to keep wigs
Courtroom
Advocates are happy to preserve their sense of identity
Scotland's advocates oppose plans to cast aside their wigs and gowns in favour of a more relaxed dress code, according to a survey.

A Faculty of Advocates survey of its 440 practising members found 80% of respondents wished to keep their distinctive courtroom dress.

The vice dean of the faculty said members felt the strict dress code provided advocates with a sense of identity.

The consultation exercise followed publicity earlier this year when a lawyer discarded his wig, because it was "old fashioned".


To dispense with something which is instantly recognisable would be of no benefit to the legal profession or the nation as a whole

Roy Martin
Faculty Vice Dean

The faculty was founded in 1532 as an independent body of lawyers.

Its code of professional practice requires members to wear the wig and style of gown appropriate for junior or senior counsel.

Colin McEachran QC, who specialises in medical negligence cases, appeared bare-headed at the Court of Session in Edinburgh earlier this year.

He said the wigs were "old-fashioned" and the profession should modernise.

Court trademark

But Roy Martin, vice dean of the faculty, said members were happy to adhere to the strict code.

He said: "Our members agree that court dress provides advocates with an obvious symbol of their professional identity in the mind of the public.

"And it represents a positive link with the best traditions in the practice of the law by the independent bar in Scotland."

He added: "Court dress in its current form is a long-established trademark, both within Scotland and internationally and it immediately identifies the wearer as an advocate.

"To dispense with something which is instantly recognisable would be of no benefit to the legal profession or the nation as a whole."

See also:

06 Apr 01 | UK
14 Mar 01 | Scotland
10 Nov 98 | Politics
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Scotland stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Scotland stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes