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Sunday, 22 September, 2002, 16:54 GMT 17:54 UK
Blast victim's final gift
Yasmin Abu Ramila
Yasmin Abu Ramila is recovering after the transplant
A Scots family whose son was killed in a suicide bombing in Tel Aviv have donated his kidney to a young Palestinian girl.

The Maariv Daily newspaper says the seven-year-old girl had been waiting two years for a suitable organ.

The family of Yoni Jesner, a student from Glasgow, donated one of his kidneys to Yasmin Abu Ramila from east Jerusalem.

Yoni suffered serious head injuries in last Thursday's blast which killed six other people, including the Palestinian bomber.

Yoni Jesner
Yoni Jesner's family donated his kidney

He later died in the Ichilov Hospital after his parents consented to his life support machine being switched off.

At a media conference arranged by the Jesner family in Israel on Sunday, Ari Jesner said his brother would have been happy that someone had benefited after his death.

The Maariv Daily reported that the kidney was successfully transplanted on Friday and the girl was in a stable condition.

Dina, the girl's mother, said: "I don't know how to thank the family of the victim of the attack.


I think the most important principle here is that life was given to another human being

Ari Jesner

"I feel for their pain and thank them for the organ donation that saved my daughter's life."

Speaking at the media conference Ari Jesner said: "The family is very proud that out of this tragic situation and Yoni's death that we were able and Yoni was able to give life to others.

"I think the most important principle here is that life was given to another human being.

Youth council

"What religion, nationality, race, culture or creed is not what's important here."

Yoni came to Israel last year to study at a Jewish seminary for a year, but he decided to extend his stay and put off medical school for a further year.

After medical school, he had hoped to return to Israel.

His brother, Ari, said Yoni ran Glasgow's Jewish Youth Council and led a Jewish youth delegation to the Scottish Parliament.

In response to the suicide bombings in Um al-Fahm and Tel Aviv, the Israeli Army has encircled Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat's office in Ramallah and pulled down surrounding buildings.

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The BBC's Tim Willcox
"It was an operation to save a life"

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20 Sep 02 | Scotland
20 Sep 02 | Scotland
20 Sep 02 | Scotland
19 Sep 02 | Middle East
19 Sep 02 | Middle East
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