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Tuesday, 3 September, 2002, 11:52 GMT 12:52 UK
Anti-English claims "a myth"
Most English people are accepted by Scots, the study said.
Anti-English prejudice does not discourage people from coming to live and work in Scotland, according to new research.

A three-year-study by the University of Dundee concludes that 94% of people from England living north of the border do not believe that anti-English feeling is a problem.

The survey came after British industry chief Digby Jones caused controversy when he suggested that Scots had "an enormous chip on their shoulder" which was deterring investment from England.

Scotland's environment minister Ross Finnie responded to the comments by calling him an "English prat".


Of course anti-Englishness does exist and surfaces on occasions, especially when Scotland plays England at rugby and football

Murray Watson

The number of English people living in Scotland is expected to exceed 400,000 when the 2001 census results are published.

The research, being carried out by Murray Watson of Dundee's Department of History, showed that English people had been coming to Scotland in ever increasing numbers since the early 19th century.

The study, based on in-depth interviews with English-born people living all over Scotland, found that 88% said that their neighbours and work colleagues had accepted them and that they had assimilated easily into Scottish society.

It found that 67% said that they preferred the quality of life in Scotland to that in England.

They listed the scenery, the environment, less stress, less overcrowding, fewer traffic jams and more neighbourliness and community spirit as the attractions of Scotland.

CBI chief Digby Jones
Digby Jones: Made comments

Almost half said that after a few years living in Scotland they gained an appreciation of the differences between the two countries and that they began to feel more Scottish and British than English.

Only 18% remained steadfastly English in their outlook, though most of those wanted to continue living and working in Scotland.

Mr Watson said, "Of course anti-Englishness does exist and surfaces on occasions, especially when Scotland plays England at rugby and football.

"It is surprising that the English, of all people, who are Scotland's largest migrant group in modern history, have effectively been invisible in Scottish society.

"Their numbers have increased in the twentieth century and look set to continue to do so in spite of Digby Jones' comments and Ross Finnie's intemperate remarks."

See also:

02 Sep 02 | Scotland
01 Sep 02 | Scotland
21 Jun 02 | Scotland
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