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Tuesday, 13 August, 2002, 16:51 GMT 17:51 UK
Aquarium attacked over seafood sales
Shark
The aquarium is based in Fife
An animal rights group has called for a Scottish aquarium to end the "bizarre" practice of selling seafood in its restaurant.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (Peta) has asked Deep Sea World in North Queensferry to use soya-based alternatives to fish in its cafe.

Peta spokeswoman Dawn Carr wrote to the centre, saying: "Your aquarium purports to be a place where one can learn about and admire fish.

"But how can anyone stand in awe of these glorious, fascinating creatures and then head over to the cafeteria and stick a fork in them?"

Shark
The aquarium rejected the group's demands

In the letter, which was addressed to the aquarium's chief executive, Stuart Earley, Ms Carr said all fish were as different as individuals.

She wrote: "It makes it very tough to eat fish after you've gotten to know them.

"Even the word seafood shows how we have stripped these magnificent animals of any individuality and value beyond their utility to us."

Ms Carr added: "The idea of going to an aquarium to learn about and admire fish and then eating them afterwards is downright bizarre."

But Deep Sea World insisted the aquarium had no intention of taking fish off its menu.

Mr Earley said: "Scotland's national aquarium attracts a huge number of different visitors and we feel they have the right to free choice.

'No alligator burgers'

"This is why our restaurant provides visitors with a range of menu options.

"In addition to meat and fish, we have a choice of vegetarian dishes.

"We are confident that we provide something for everyone whatever their culinary or political persuasion."

Meanwhile, the Scottish Deer Centre in Cupar, Fife, which is home to 900 of the animals, confirmed that it sold venison but refused to comment further.

But a spokeswoman for Edinburgh Zoo said: "None of the animals here are onsale in the restaurant in any way. We certainly don't sell gorilla or alligator burgers."

See also:

03 Jul 02 | England
05 May 02 | Scotland
28 Dec 00 | Scotland
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