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Thursday, 1 August, 2002, 15:33 GMT 16:33 UK
Floods cost into 'millions'
Man and dog in fire service inflatable
Fire officers rescue two local occupants
The final bill for the damage caused to Glasgow by severe flooding is set to run to several million pounds, according to the city council.

In the east end, the worst affected part of the city, people have been counting the cost of the havoc caused by the torrential rain.

Many residents say they did not have home contents insurance and now face large debts.

The city councillor for the Shettleston area, George Ryan, said the flooding was caused by the Victorian sewerage system and called for action from Scottish Water.


Officials... are visiting people to assess the situation and what they will need in terms of re-housing

City council spokesman

Rescuers and clean-up staff were only able to reach 230 homes in the Greenfield area on Wednesday night.

The council said 98 properties were still experiencing problems on Thursday afternoon.

At its height on Tuesday night and early on Wednesday, 1,500 residents in 500 homes were affected.

A council spokesman said: "The weather has improved and the water has all but disappeared.

Combined factors

"We are cleaning up the sludge and officials from our social work and housing departments are visiting people to assess the situation and what they will need in terms of re-housing.

"The bill is going to be millions of pounds but at the moment we don't know exactly how much it will be."

On the cause of the floods, which submerged cars in the worst areas, the spokesman said: "It is a combination of things and not one thing on its own.

Residents in Shettleston
Residents count the cost of the flooding

"The excessive rain and the sewage system, which is pretty old, were both factors."

The council were today carrying out checks on underground pipes to find out why the floods were so severe, he added.

Mr Ryan said it was "well known" that the sewerage system in Shettleston was out of date.

He called for action to modernise the system and said the issue was raised with West of Scotland Water, the predecessor to the new unitary authority Scottish Water.

"My concern is that this was avoidable and has been well known and well documented for quite a long time," the Shettleston councillor said.

'19th century sewer'

"That part of Shettleston and Greenfield is at the bottom of a valley and the Victorian sewer that runs north to south just hasn't got the capacity to deal with excess of water.

"I can almost certainly guess that as soon as there is any kind of rainfall that there will be some more flooding in my area.

"We've got a 19th century sewer trying to deal with 21st century problems."


The flooding in the Cockenzie Street area is due to the impact of surface water run-off rather than a lack of capacity in the sewer network

Scottish Water spokesman

Scottish Water said it had been working closely with Glasgow City Council since Tuesday but denied that the sewer capacity was to blame.

A spokesman said: "The flooding resulted from extremely intense rainfall in the area.

"The limited observation of the sewer network which can be carried out at present suggested that the flooding in the Cockenzie Street area is due to the impact of surface water run-off rather than a lack of capacity in the sewer network.

"A full investigation is currently under way to determine all the causes of flooding in the Shettleston area."

Graveyard search

The search has been continuing for a young man who fell into a water-filled hole at Riddrie cemetery in Glasgow's east end.

Eyewitnesses saw David Storrie, 18, disappear after the ground appeared to give way beneath him as he walked his dog during Tuesday's downpour.

Rail services and roads were particularly badly affected by the rain but the situation was continuing to return to normal on Thursday.

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 ON THIS STORY
Councillor George Ryan
"As soon as there is any kind of rainfall that there will be some more flooding in my area"
See also:

31 Jul 02 | Scotland
31 Jul 02 | Scotland
31 Jul 02 | Scotland
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