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Monday, 8 July, 2002, 07:20 GMT 08:20 UK
Drivers' habits under police scrutiny
Traffic police in a car
The clampdown will last for seven days
Bad mannered and irresponsible drivers are to be targeted by police in a new summer road safety campaign.

Strathclyde Police will be clamping down on motorists who are being distracted from their driving by things like talking on a mobile phone or putting on make-up.

Each day of the seven-day campaign, which begins on Monday, will focus on a different problem, such as lane discipline, driving on the hard shoulder and driver fatigue.

Previous initiatives have seen drivers caught trying to overtake while eating a burger, not paying attention to road signs because they are reading maps and failing to stay in lane while talking on a mobile phone.

Driver using a mobile phone
This is the kind of behaviour police want to stop

A police spokesman said road manners were important during busy holiday times because too many drivers become flustered and aggressive, and that can lead to dangerous behaviour.

Officers will carry out high-profile patrols in the Strathclyde force area, while also targeting specific events where there may be large numbers of vehicles and roads which may be busy with holiday traffic.

The clampdown will be particularly focused on main roads and motorways.

Chief Superintendent Alistair Anderson, the force's head of traffic, said: "Too many motorists are losing their concentration on the road by paying attention to something else, whether it be talking on the phone or reading maps and directions, which means that the driver is not in full control of the car.

"Others are too easily flustered, and become aggressive, driving too close to the car in front, or over-taking in the near-side lane."

He added: "Despite the large volume of traffic, motorists must bear in mind that you will not get to your destination any quicker by driving erratically, and indeed, you may fatally injure someone on the way."

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC Scotland's Alan Mackay reports
"Holiday times are when road manners get worse"
See also:

14 Jun 02 | Scotland
13 Jun 02 | Scotland
22 Apr 02 | Scotland
15 Apr 02 | Scotland
10 Apr 02 | Scotland
07 Jul 01 | Scotland
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