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Wednesday, 29 May, 2002, 16:25 GMT 17:25 UK
Queen's glorious rain in Borders
Children in raincoats
Raincoats were the order of the day in the Borders
The Queen has brought her Golden Jubilee tour of Scotland to an end with a visit to the Borders.

Torrential rain failed to dampen spirits and the heavy downpour prompted a brass band to launch into Singing in the Rain as the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh arrived in Lauder.

Dressed in a lime green coat and hat, the Queen alighted from the royal car carrying a clear plastic umbrella to protect her from the downpour.

Queen on walkabout
The Queen carried a brolly on walkabout
The royal couple met local dignitaries and viewed items of local interest, including the Royal Charter of 1502 which declared Lauder a royal burgh.

The Queen then walked to Lauder Kirk where schoolchildren sang a song called The March of Time, which was composed especially for the visit.

The rain stopped just before the Queen and Duke left the kirk and the couple then spent about 10 minutes chatting to 4,000 well-wishers who had braved the elements to see them.

After that, the royal couple travelled to Melrose Abbey, where the Queen was shown the stone marking the burial place of Robert the Bruce's heart.

They then attended a lunch in their honour organised by Scottish Borders Council.

Rugby final

Melrose played host to a Golden Jubilee Gathering which attracted a 4,000-strong crowd on Wednesday afternoon.

The event included representatives from all of the local common ridings, festivals and gatherings, including Hawick, West Linton, Selkirk, Yetholm, Melrose, Peebles, Galashiels, Duns, Jedburgh, Kelso, Langholm, Lauder and Coldstream.

The event featured a re-enactment of the world's oldest seven-a-side rugby final, which was first contested by Melrose and Gala almost 120 years ago.

Gala captain David Bowen collected a commemorative trophy from the Queen after a 12-5 victory.


I should like to tell you how much the Duke of Edinburgh and I have enjoyed returning to the Scottish Borders

The Queen
Local children also braved blustery and showery conditions to stage a fashion parade for the royal couple.

"Before leaving, I should like to tell you how much the Duke of Edinburgh and I have enjoyed returning to the Scottish Borders," the Queen told the crowd.

Speaking later, Colin Kemp, conductor of Selkirk Silver Band, said the rain in Lauder proved a challenge.

He said: "This is probably the worst conditions we have played in.

"We usually have raincoats but it was nice this morning and we decided to dispense with them. You cannot plan for the weather."

Mr Kemp said the band had planned to play Singing in the Rain but never expected it to have such relevance.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC Scotland's Isabel Fraser reports
"The area's royal links have been emphasised throughout the day"

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See also:

28 May 02 | Scotland
27 May 02 | Scotland
26 May 02 | Scotland
25 May 02 | Scotland
24 May 02 | Scotland
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