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Thursday, 25 April, 2002, 15:06 GMT 16:06 UK
Sex change woman banned from driving
Sheriff Court sign
Sheriff James Tierney said he was limiting the ban
A woman has been banned from driving in Scotland - 13 years after being disqualified for the same offence as a man.

Megan Alexander, who underwent a sex change operation in the 1990s, is believed to be the first person in Scotland to have been banned from driving as both a man and a woman.

She was banned for 15 months and fined 200 at Perth Sheriff Court on Thursday.

Sheriff James Tierney said he was taking into account she was unwell at the time of the incident.

Ms Alexander had been drinking when she was stopped in July 2000.


Whatever motives people might have for reporting you, you are still required to comply with the law

Sheriff
James Tierney

But she refused to provide a breath test and claimed she was being victimised.

Solicitor David Holmes said his client no longer owned a car and was living on 80 per week incapacity benefit.

"Her house had been burgled shortly before this," Mr Holmes said.

Psychiatric report

"She had also been refused entry to various establishments in Perth and felt she was being victimised.

"She felt she was a victim in this case and was not prepared to co-operate until the arrival of a solicitor or similar counsel.

"She had taken alcohol, but did think she would have been able and capable of driving at the time. There are two similar convictions but they were some time distant in her life."

Police breathalyser
Ms Alexander refused to provide a breath test

Sheriff Tierney said he was limiting the ban and fine because of the problems Alexander had encountered.

He said: "It's clear from the psychiatrist's report that at the time you were fairly unwell and it's also clear you were suffering from a whole range of stresses in your life.

"I take these factors into account.

"But you have to accept the police have got a job to do and if they have suspicions they are entitled to require you to give specimens.

"Whatever motives people might have for reporting you, you are still required to comply with the law."

Malcolm Alexander, as she was then known, had two previous convictions in 1987 and 1989 for drink driving offences.

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