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Monday, 4 March, 2002, 15:50 GMT
Chinook crash: Timeline
All 29 people on board were killed
All 29 people on board were killed
The controversy over the helicopter disaster has raged for eight years. BBC News Online looks back at some key moments in the campaign to re-examine the crash.

June 1994: Four RAF aircrew and 25 terrorism experts die when a Chinook helicopter crashes on the Mull of Kintyre as it returns from Northern Ireland.

1995: An RAF board of inquiry finds nothing to clearly indicate what caused the crash.

Based on the limited evidence, it says the wrong rate of climb was a contributorty factor, although technical malfunction cannot be positively disproved.

However, two air marshalls who review the evidence find flight lieutenants Richard Cook and Jonathan Tapper had been grossly negligent.

1996: A fatal accident inquiry leaves open the question of what caused the accident, but the sheriff recommends the immediate installation of cockpit voice and accident data recorders.

May 1998: The Commons Defence Committee reports that the helicopter involved in the crash was not suffering from "fundamental flaws", but makes no judgement on the immediate cause of the crash.

May 1999: Computer Weekly publishes evidence - not available to crash investigators - that the helicopter's FADEC engine control software was not reliable and may have been the cause of the crash.

Flt Lt Tapper is said by the magazine to have expressed concerns about the speed at which the Chinook's "full authority digital engine control" was being put into service.

July 2000: Prime Minister Tony Blair promises to look personally at the circumstances of the crash, but stresses he will not reopen the inquiry.

November 2000: Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon, backed by Mr Blair, again rejects fresh calls for a new inquiry.

Weeks later the Commons' Public Accounts Committee presents a report disputing the original inquiry's findings.

It says there were repeated problems with the aircraft and the pilots should be exonerated, but the government insists the report is "superficial" and says "nothing new". Angry campaigners call the response a cover-up.

April 2001: Peers vote in favour of a House of Lords all-party inquiry into the crash, after the government bows to pressure and allows the vote for a fresh investigation to go ahead.

The move is welcomed by Mike Tapper, father of Flt Lft Tapper, who has been campaigning to clear his son's name.

June 2001: Lord Jauncey of Tullichettle, a former Scottish appeal court judge, is named as chairman of a five-strong House of Lords committee to report on the crash early in 2002.

February 2002: The two RAF pilots are cleared of blame for the 1994 crash by Lord Jauncey's inquiry.

It concluded there was no justification for finding fault with the men, piling further pressure on the government to officially clear the pilots.

See also:

05 Feb 02 | Scotland
05 Feb 02 | Scotland
23 Jan 02 | Scotland
15 Oct 01 | Scotland
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