BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Scotland  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 29 November, 2001, 15:18 GMT
Scots farmers' 178m payout
Burning animals
Thousands of animals were culled during the outbreak
Scotland's farmers have received more than 178m in compensation for animals culled during the foot-and-mouth epidemic, it has emerged.

Figures released by the UK Government showed that three individual farmers received compensation payments totalling nearly 11m.

The highest single payment was one of just over 4.6m to a farmer in Dumfries for the destruction of pedigree cattle and sheep.


Given the hardship caused by foot-and-mouth disease the 14% increase in total income from farming is a tribute to the resilience of Scottish farmers

Minister Ross Finnie
However, another farmer in the same region received the smallest payment - of just 22.

In total, nearly 1,900 individual compensation payments have been made to date in Scotland over the outbreak, which struck Dumfries and Galloway and the Borders.

The figures were included in written parliamentary answers from UK Farming Minister Elliott Morley.

They showed that more than 40 farmers in the UK have received more than 1m apiece in compensation.

These also included one farmer in Roxburghshire who was awarded 3.2m.

Loss of herds

A further 278 have received payments of between 500,000 and 1m, while more than 800 have been paid between 250,000 and 500,000.

The National Farmers' Union of Scotland has previously defended the payment levels insisting that, in many cases, they do not properly compensate for the loss of herds which have taken generations to build up.

The news came on the same day as it was estimated that farming income in Scotland would rise by 14% this year.

The Total Income From Farming (TIFF) represents business profits plus income to farmers, partners and directors and those with an entrepreneurial interest in the businesses.

Farmer's sign
Foot-and-mouth struck two parts of Scotland
Rural Development Minister Ross Finnie said: "Given the hardship caused by foot-and-mouth disease the 14% increase in total income from farming is a tribute to the resilience of Scottish farmers.

"Now we are once again able to export our livestock products to Europe and coupled with the continued relaxation of foot-and-mouth restrictions, I very much hope that next year will see a further increase in farm incomes."

The Scottish Executive said that, despite the increase, TIFF in Scotland was forecast to be two thirds below its recent peak of 1995.

A spokesman said that the figures did not include either the losses or the compensation connected with foot-and-mouth.

"Official estimates of the foot-and-mouth compensation and its effect on net worth will be published on 31 January," he added.



Analysis

Background

AUDIO VIDEO

CLICKABLE GUIDES

FORUM

INTERNET LINKS
See also:

29 Nov 01 | England
27 Nov 01 | England
08 Nov 01 | England
05 Aug 01 | Scotland
28 Jul 01 | Scotland
14 Jul 01 | Scotland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Scotland stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Scotland stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes