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Sunday, 5 August, 2001, 17:32 GMT 18:32 UK
Farmer in '4.2m payout'
Sheep
Compensation claims have been made by 37 farmers
A Scottish farmer has been given 4.2m in compensation for losing his livestock in the foot-and mouth-cull, it has been alleged.

A newspaper report on Sunday claimed that Jim Goldie, who owns two farms in Dumfriesshire, received the payout from the Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra).

It also says that Mr Goldie is one of nearly 40 farmers who have lodged compensation claims for more than 1m each.


Outsiders may think we got a lot of money but we have seen our lives destroyed and our business wiped out and that money will go to rebuilding it

Jim Goldie, quoted in the Sunday Times
Defra have confirmed the figures which appeared in the Sunday Times.

A spokesman said 37 claims had been received.

He added: "We are considering them and where we agree with the valuation of the livestock the money would be paid."

Now the Labour MP for Clydesdale, Jimmy Hood, has called for an urgent public inquiry into the costs of the foot and mouth outbreak.

The newspaper report was published the day after it was revealed through research for the BBC that vaccinating animals against the disease would have been at least 3bn cheaper than slaughtering them.

It is understood Mr Goldie received the multi-million payout after losing a prime herd of Charolais and Limousin cattle.

'Fair compensation'

His animals at South Bowerhouses were killed in March after disease was confirmed.

The farmer of 32 years refused to confirm to the Sunday Times how much compensation he had received.

But he said the government had created the animal health regulations and it was only fair for farmers to be compensated for adhering to them.

He is quoted as saying: "The money we got was for the value of our stock but we got nothing for the income we lost.

'Rural businesses suffer'

"Outsiders may think we got a lot of money but we have seen our lives destroyed and our business wiped out and that money will go to rebuilding it."

Bill Anderson, of the Forum of Private Business in Scotland, said he had sympathy with farmers who had "lost their life's works and livelihoods".

But he added: "These awards contrast with the miserly consideration given to other rural businesses who, also, have lost their life's works and livelihoods.

"In particular we contrast this with the plight of hotels in rural Scotland."

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Alexandra MacKenzie reports
"MP Jimmy Hood has called for a public inquiry into the compensation payouts"
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