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Wednesday, 6 December, 2000, 16:19 GMT
Queen's speech: The Scottish impact
The Queen delivers the speech
The Queen delivers the speech at Westminster
New powers to seize the assets of drug dealers and crack down on benefit fraud in Scotland have been outlined in the Queen's speech.

The proposals were among the handful of measures outlined in the UK Government's new legislative programme which will affect Scotland.

The other measures whch are not restricted to England and Wales include a UK-wide ban on tobacco advertising.

Michael Martin
Speaker Michael Martin, MP for Glasgow Springburn
Plans to close loopholes on trafficking and brokering arms, and strengthen controls on chemical, biological and nuclear weapons, will also take effect in Scotland.

And Scottish Secretary John Reid said Scottish companies would benefit from the Regulatory Reform Bill, which will cut red tape and simplify business rules.

He said the Special Educational Needs and Disability Bill would also improve the rights of thousands of disabled schoolchildren and students in Scotland.

Rail safety proposals, should they become law, would also be likely to be implemented in Scotland.

Dr Reid said the government's programme reflected the continuing success of devolution.

"As the process of devolution beds down, legislation affecting Scotland will continue to come from both parliaments," he said.

Hit criminals

"Many of the bills announced complement the Scottish Executive's legislative programme, demonstrating the partnership of parliaments at the heart of the devolution settlement."

Dr Reid said the Proceeds of Crime Bill would hit criminals where it hurts them most - in their pockets.

"It will mean a more effective way of targeting and confiscating the proceeds of crime, and will include specific Scottish provisions to fit within the Scottish justice system," he said.

A range of measures were also outlined at Westminster focusing on crime in an attempt to crack down on ''yob culture'.


We have seen nothing that will go to the heart of the problems in our rural areas

Michael Moore, Liberal Democrats
These included the adoption across Britain of the curfew initiative which was introduced on the streets of Hamilton by Strathclyde Police.

Former Scottish National Party leader Alex Salmond described the speech as "tub-thumping populist stuff in the lead up to the election".

He added: "It demonstrates how much it is a Queen's Speech for England and how much the government's concentration now is south of the border."

Liberal Democrat MP Michael Moore said there was little in the speech for Scotland because labour was "pandering to middle England".

"We have seen nothing that will go to the heart of the problems in our rural areas," he said.

And Conservative MP Eleanor Laing said: "It does very little for Scotland because the Labour government takes its votes in Scotland for granted."


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06 Dec 00 | UK Politics
05 Dec 00 | Scotland
14 Oct 00 | Scotland
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