Skip to main content
bbc.co.uk
Home
TV
Radio
Talk
Where I Live
A-Z Index

BBC News

BBC Election 2005

Watch the BBC Election News
SERVICES
  • Election news alerts
  • Email services
  • Mobiles/PDAs
  • News for your site
Last Updated: Monday, 2 May, 2005, 15:09 GMT 16:09 UK
Election at-a-glance: 2 May
All you need to know about Day 28 of the UK's 2005 general election campaign, at-a-glance:

2 MAY IN A SENTENCE

As the election campaign enters its final week, Labour warns of a "back door " Conservative victory, while the Lib Dems talk about trust and Michael Howard sets out his top priorities if he becomes prime minister.

CAMPAIGN CATCH-UP

The three main parties are making a final push to get votes three days before the general election on Thursday.

Tony Blair and Gordon Brown tour marginal constituencies in an effort to boost the Labour vote.


Former BBC director general Greg Dyke, who has switched his support to the Lib Dems, says another Blair government would be a danger to democracy.


Michael Howard reveals his timetable for implementing the party's eight priority tasks if the Conservatives win the election.


Former Liberal leader Jeremy Thorpe joins the election fray over the "disastrous" aftermath of the Iraq war.

PICK OF THE ANALYSIS

All three big parties have entered the closing days of the campaign by concentrating on their core themes.

If you have ever wished there was a 99p coin, or wanted a public inquiry into vet's fees, or perhaps a tax on caravans - well, there could still be a party for you.

A VIEW FROM GERMANY

Germany's Sueddeutsche Zeitung newspaper website declares that the British election campaign has found its issue for the final few days - the Iraq war.

Doubts within the government over the war were set out by the country's Attorney General Lord Goldsmith in a confidential document that is no longer quite so confidential, it says.

For all that, it adds, the outrage over Prime Minister Tony Blair's brazen attitude to the truth is hardly likely to be reflected in the way people cast their votes: the country is sloughing off the past, the future belongs to other issues.

The newspaper's editorial says this adds to one's irritation at the way all the political parties have joined in a kind of unholy alliance to turn a blind eye to the key problem that will face the new House of Commons after the election - Europe.

While continental Europe looks transfixed at France and the outcome of its referendum on the EU Constitution, Blair's stance seems to suggest that this constitution is nothing to do with him, it adds.

Sueddeutsche Zeitung says the Tories, meanwhile, are unable to bring themselves to utter the word "Europe", fully aware as they are that notwithstanding all the populist opposition to Europe, the country's economic and political future has long been inextricably tied to the EU continent and the French decision.

It adds that seeing Europe's potential for splitting their own supporters, the Tories steer clear of any decision.

Blair is now intimating that he would not even hold a referendum in his own country if the earlier one in France fails, the paper says.

A week before the general election, it says this admission of cowardice, this assertion of apathy, combined with the Conservatives' defensive twitches, together present a pathetic picture.

Sueddeutsche Zeitung concludes Europe's internal constitutional shape - whether in Great Britain, France, or Germany - is lamentable.

PHOTO OF THE DAY

Sandra Howard, Michael Howard and Bill Roache
Sandra and Michael Howard meet actor Bill Roache, alias Coronation Street's Ken Barlow, at a Tory event in Manchester. Mr Howard said it was a "wonderful compliment" to have been compared with the soap character.

QUOTE OF THE DAY

I'm unable to support a Labour Party led by Tony Blair
Former BBC director general Greg Dyke





LINKS TO MORE ELECTION 2005 STORIES


 


PREVIOUS DAYS AT-A-GLANCE

WEEK FIVE
 
WEEK FOUR
 
WEEK THREE
 
WEEK TWO
 

WEEK ONE
 


TOP ELECTION 2005 STORIES NOW