Page last updated at 15:36 GMT, Wednesday, 28 April 2010 16:36 UK

Lib Dem pledge to support green technology in Scotland

General view of wind turbines
Mr Scott said renewable energy technology would generate jobs

Scotland has the potential to become a world leader in green technology, Scottish Lib Dem leader Tavish Scott has said.

On a visit to Aberdeen, he pledged support to transfer oil and gas engineering skills to green industries.

Mr Scott said: "This country has the potential to become the renewables powerhouse of Europe."

He also said people across the UK had enough of Labour and the Conservatives, describing them as "tired old parties".

The Scottish Liberal Democrat leader urged government and industry to work together to promote Scottish renewable energy technology on a visit to Rotech's tidal power unit.

He said the party would deliver a "zero carbon Britain" by 2050, with plans including the development of electricity networks and investment in building offshore wind turbines.

'Tory desperation'

"Going green not only tackles climate change, it generates jobs," Mr Scott said.

"And it puts Scotland ahead of the green technology curve.

"We have a chance to be world leaders in green technology if government and industry seize the day."

Mr Scott also criticised any moves by the Conservatives to align themselves with the SNP in a hung parliament.

"I think it illustrates the length and depth of the Tory desperation that they are now trying to cuddle Alex Salmond," he added.



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