Page last updated at 12:29 GMT, Sunday, 25 April 2010 13:29 UK

Queen guitar legend Brian May defends hunting ban

Dan Norris (left) and Brian May
Brian May met Mr Norris (left) at an event in Keynsham

Queen guitarist Brian May has backed a Labour candidate while launching a one-man campaign to keep the hunting ban on the statute books.

Rock star May, 62, appeared in Keynsham to back Labour candidate Dan Norris for the Somerset North East seat.

As an MP, Mr Norris was pelted with eggs by pro-hunting campaigners in the build up to the ban back in 2005.

Mr May said he was spurred into action by the lobbying power of pro-hunt Countryside Alliance on Conservatives.

'Save Me'

His campaign is titled Save Me, after a successful Queen song penned by Mr May.

He said: "If he [David Cameron] gets his way, we will have a House of Commons packed with people who support the Countryside Alliance.

"I would much rather be at home playing the guitar. I'm only here because David Cameron made it an issue."

The millionaire rock star also campaigns against badger culls, and labelled Tory Leicestershire council leader David Parsons a "pathetic, arrogant, jumped-up, snivelling little dweeb," for attacking his anti-hunt stance.

Conservative candidate Jacob Rees-Mogg said: "We have a country with a £163bn annual deficit, a failing educational system and war in Afghanistan and all Labour can talk about is a hunting ban which doesn't work."

Liberal Democrat candidate Gail Coleshill said: "Dan Norris seems to be more interested in meeting ageing rock stars and furry foxes than talking to his constituents at elections hustings."



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SEE ALSO
Queen guitarist backs badger case
22 Mar 10 |  Wales
Final hunts held as ban looms
17 Feb 05 |  UK Politics

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