Page last updated at 20:03 GMT, Thursday, 27 May 2010 21:03 UK

David Cameron's family make move into Downing Street

Removal men unpack the Camerons' furnitute in Downing Street
It is two weeks since David Cameron became prime minister

David Cameron and his family have moved into Downing Street, two weeks after he became prime minister.

Mr Cameron, his pregnant wife Samantha and their two children will initially live in the flat above No 10.

But they will move into the larger, 11 Downing Street property next door, home to the Blairs from 1997 to 2007, once it is refurbished.

Earlier the prime minister told the BBC his family had had their "last breakfast" at their west London home.

Asked if he was going to be selling the family home, Mr Cameron replied: "I certainly won't be renting it out for Miss Whiplash if that's what you mean."

That was a reference to the difficulties his one-time boss, the then Chancellor Norman Lamont, got into renting out his property during the Major government.

FROM THE TODAY PROGRAMME

Mr Cameron, who said he had "quite a lot of other meetings and things I've got to do at the same time" as moving, was also asked to give two horse racing tips by Today's sports reporter Garry Richardson.

The PM, who was given about a minute to make his selection from the newspaper racing pages, came up with Daring Dream in the 3.50pm at Ayr for those who were a "fan of the coalition".

For those who were "slightly more sceptical" about how the coalition would work out he suggested Midnight Fantasy in the 3pm at Wolverhampton.

William Hill later claimed they "had been inundated by punters wanting to back the PM's tips".

If so they would have lost money on Midnight Fantasy, which finished fifth. An each way flutter on Daring Dream would just have paid off, after it finished second at odds of 7/2.



Print Sponsor



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2017 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific