Page last updated at 00:48 GMT, Thursday, 11 March 2010

Wellderly and webinar on new list of 'banned jargon'

Council tax documents
Council forms are often full of jargon, campaigners say

Wellderly, webinar, disbenefits and under-capacitated are among new forms of jargon being used by the public sector, a survey has revealed.

Such "impenetrable phrases" are on a list of "banned words" published by the Local Government Association (LGA).

It said government departments, local authorities and quangos were all guilty of crimes against the English language.

Also on the 250-word list are tonality, trialogue, clienting and "goldfish bowl facilitated conversation".

Phrases previously outlawed by the LGA - which represents local authorities in England and Wales - include synergies, contestability and mainstreaming.

'Plain English'

The LGA said it was "impossible" for organisations to avoid all jargon in internal communications but there was no excuse for such language to be used in public information.

It said it was working with local authorities to remove such words from council documents and had launched a "plain English" website to help guide them.

"The public sector must not hide behind impenetrable jargon and phrases," said Margaret Eaton, LGA chairman.

"Why do we have to have a 'webinar trialogue for the wellderly' when the public sector could just talk about caring for the elderly instead?

"During the recession, it is vital that we explain to people in plain English how to get access to the services the public sector provides with taxpayers' money."



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SEE ALSO
Calls to cut jargon in politics
27 Nov 09 |  West
The Record Review
04 Dec 09 |  UK Politics
Councils get banned jargon list
18 Mar 09 |  UK Politics
'No jargon' promise from council
20 Jan 09 |  Staffordshire

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