Page last updated at 15:41 GMT, Thursday, 28 January 2010

Yemen conference fails to excite Arab press interest

Yemeni Foreign Minister Abu Bakr al-Qirbi, UK Foreign Secretary David Milliband, and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

Most of the Middle East press displayed little or no enthusiasm for the international conference on Yemen held in London. One exception was a UAE commentator who saw it as a "golden opportunity" to help the region's most impoverished country solve its problems and Yemen's al-Thawrah, which was pleased that Yemeni sovereignty had not been violated.

Other papers were worried that if the US became involved, Yemen would go the way of Iraq or Afghanistan while several suggested that providing money to fight al-Qaeda was not enough and one called for help in steering Yemeni society away from tribalism.

MUHAMMAD AL-HAMMADI in UAE'S AL-ITTIHAD

This is a golden opportunity to solve Yemen's problems, as concerned Gulf, Arab, regional and international parties are participating in this meeting... It does not seem that financial assistance is all that Yemen needs; all kinds of aid are needed today and should be agreed on at this unrepeatable meeting.

EDITORIAL in YEMEN'S AL-THAWRAH

The success of London's meeting - held yesterday with more than 21 leading Arab and international states taking part - deals a strong blow to corrupt people trading in politics at home and abroad who were betting that this meeting would represent a loophole to violate Yemen's sovereignty, internationalise its case and breach its national constants.

SUBHI ZU'AYTAR in SAUDI AL-WATAN

Yemen does not only need money from foreign countries, blocs and the international political organisations convening in London, it also needs programmes drawn up to help Yemenis and to transform them from tribal communities to a productive society capable of coping with modern times… as illiteracy in Yemen, which could be the highest in the Arab world... is a direct cause of the spread of ignorance, tribalism and adherence to old traditions.

HODA AL-HUSAYN in LONDON-BASED AL-SHARQ AL-AWSAT

Al-Qaeda poses a dangerous threat in Yemen. However, any military operation carried out by the Yemeni armed forces should only target the most dangerous terror cells. At the same time, the USA and the countries in the region that want to rescue Yemen should put pressure on the government to be more democratic and less corrupt. Only by doing this, can they attract the support of the Yemeni people. Otherwise, with its bloody chaos and corruption, Yemen will become just like Iraq and Afghanistan.

ABD-AL-BARI ATWAN in LONDON-BASED AL-QUDS AL-ARABI

What is clear to us is that US military, security and financial intervention in Yemen will not make Yemen any better than either Iraq or Afghanistan. The USA has been fighting al-Qaeda and the Taliban for over nine years and yet it has not achieved any outstanding success. In fact, these wars have strengthened the two organizations and increased their dangers... What is known for sure is that US interference will not bring stability to Yemen.

EDITORIAL in QATAR'S AL-RAYAH

Yemen's stability, continuation and victory in its war requires a real international commitment to fulfil promises and financial pledges. The international community pledged in 2006… to provide five billion US dollars aid to the Yemeni government. This aid, however, has not yet been received by Yemen and this could cast doubts on the credibility of the international community's intentions to help Yemen out of its crisis.

RAFIQ KHURI in LEBANON'S AL-ANWAR

No state appears on the international concern screen, unless it is in big trouble... Yemen, as seen by a British official, is Afghanistan with a sea... The priority at the London conference is fighting Al-Qaeda and providing aid to prevent Yemen from becoming a failed state. The priority in Sanaa is to receive financial aid without foreign military intervention.

BBC Monitoring selects and translates news from radio, television, press, news agencies and the internet from 150 countries in more than 70 languages. It is based in Caversham, UK, and has several bureaux abroad.



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