Page last updated at 08:14 GMT, Monday, 24 August 2009 09:14 UK

Tories claim poor being let down

Council estate
The Tories claim the government has let down the poor

The government is failing the poorest communities in England by failing to crack down properly on crime levels, the Conservatives say.

Figures released by the Tories suggest the 20 most deprived council wards are in the top 10% for crime.

Shadow home secretary Chris Grayling said Labour had "let down" the poor and could no longer claim to be "the party of progressive politics".

The Conservatives analysed 32,000 wards in England.

The party found the most deprived, Speke in Liverpool, had the 68th highest level of crime and disorder.

'Endless initiatives'

The second most deprived, Harpurhey in Manchester, was ranked seventh, and also had the second highest level of child poverty.

The third most deprived ward, Golf Green in Tendring, Essex, was 1,303th for crime. The fourth, Park in Blackpool, was 2,075th; and the fifth, Vauxhall in Liverpool, was ranked 683rd.

Mr Grayling, who is due to give a speech about social inequality on Tuesday, said: "Over the past 10 years we have seen big increases in violence, in knife and gun crime in Britain, and now even burglary is on the increase again.

"The people who are at the sharp end of this are the people who face the biggest challenges in their lives in some of our most deprived communities.

"Billions of pounds, endless initiatives and a decade of rhetoric later, and the reality is the government has let those people down comprehensively."



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