Page last updated at 16:19 GMT, Friday, 20 February 2009

Goody's fiance's curfew relaxed

Max Clifford says Goody is delighted

Jade Goody's fiance Jack Tweed has had his curfew conditions relaxed to allow him to spend his wedding night with her, says the Ministry of Justice.

The terms of Tweed's curfew, imposed following his release from prison, will be changed to reflect the "exceptional" circumstances, a spokesman said.

Tweed is on curfew after being convicted of assault last year.

In a statement, the couple said they were "absolutely thrilled" with the authorities' decision.

Tweed was jailed for 18 months last September after assaulting a teenager with a golf club.

He was released early from Wayland Prison in Norfolk last month on condition he wears a tag and returns to his mother's house in Essex by 7pm each day.

'Enormous sympathy'

Goody, who has terminal cancer and has been told she has weeks to live, was reported to have been "heartbroken" at the prospect of spending her wedding night alone because of Tweed's release conditions, which the authorities had reportedly refused to waive.

A Ministry of Justice spokesman said: "The National Offender Management Service chief operating officer, in discussion with the governor of the prison, has determined that this is an exceptional case and Mr Tweed will be allowed to remain at the reception and at that address until 3pm the day after the wedding."

Jack Tweed talks about being tagged - courtesy LIVING TV

He said Justice Secretary Jack Straw had "enormous sympathy" for Goody and her family, adding: "She has shown extraordinary courage and our thoughts are with her."

Prime Minister Gordon Brown said the curfew conditions were a "matter for the legal authorities" but "everybody is sad about the tragedy that has befallen" her.

The 27-year-old was diagnosed with cervical cancer while appearing on the Indian version of Big Brother in 2008. After undergoing chemotherapy and several surgical procedures, she was told in January that the disease had spread to her bowel, liver and groin.

Shetty support

She plans to marry Tweed, who was released early from an 18-month prison sentence last month, at a country house hotel in Essex.

Max Clifford, the couple's publicist, welcomed the decision to waive the curfew.

He said: "We are absolutely thrilled. It will be the dream finish to her dream day, and it makes so much difference.

HOME DETENTION CURFEWS
Introduced in England and Wales in Jan 1999
Allows some prisoners to be released early subject to a curfew
They must wear an electronic tag and sign a licence agreeing to remain at an agreed address at certain times, usually 7pm-7am
Usually used for people serving between 3 months and 4 years
Prisoners must pass a risk assessment and home circumstances check
If curfew is broken, the tag alerts contractors and prisoner may be recalled to jail

"Our heartfelt thanks from Jade and from Jack for allowing him to stay the evening in these very special circumstances."

The wedding is understood to be fetching close to 1m in broadcast and magazine rights.

Goody and Tweed were visited on Thursday by Bishop Jonathan Blake, of the independent London-based Open Episcopal Church.

He refused to be drawn on whether he would be conducting the wedding ceremony but a source said he may be involved alongside a registrar.

Bollywood star Shilpa Shetty has, meanwhile, spoken of her wish for everyone to forget the past and support Goody.

Shetty and Goody were at the centre of the Celebrity Big Brother race row two years ago, which sparked thousands of complaints.

Viewers were outraged about the treatment of Shetty by Goody and other housemates on the Channel 4 reality TV show.

In an interview broadcast on ITV News, Ms Shetty said: "I buried the hatchet a very long time ago, not because I'd heard about her being diagnosed with cancer."

She said she had been invited to Goody's wedding but was filming in Mumbai - "but if I was in London I would definitely have been there to show her my solidarity".



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