Page last updated at 13:26 GMT, Wednesday, 14 May 2008 14:26 UK

Cameron: Brown's run out of steam

Mr Cameron claimed credit for some of the measures

David Cameron has said the government has "run out of steam" and its plans for new legislation was just an attempt to "save the prime minister's skin".

The Conservative leader welcomed many of the announcements, saying his party had proposed them in the first place.

He claimed credit for proposing an NHS constitution, more flexible working and an independent exam regulator.

The PM said the Tories were "so full of contradictions" they could not put forward a policy for Britain's future.

Mr Cameron said the government should employ a shorthand typist to go to the Conservative conference to take down his party's ideas.

Gratitude

"I hope when you get up we will get a bit of gratitude from you for all this," he told Gordon Brown.

"You can't really say we haven't got any substance when you have taken it all and put it in your Queen's Speech."

He accused the government of adopting a Conservative proposal on elected police officials which it had previously described as "completely daft".

People can see a government, not just a prime minister, that has run out of road, run out of money, run out of ideas
David Cameron

He said it was "positive" that the prime minister wanted "personalised public services".

But he questioned why the government would not back Tory plans to "bust open the state monopoly in education" and to extend the "right to buy" for social housing tenants.

'Political survival'

And he said some bills were to "clear up the mess of the last decade" - including what he called a broken promise on ending mixed sex NHS wards and the because the government "completely failed to plan for" the scale of immigration.

"It is another relaunch, and he's had to bring it forward. He's still struggling to implement last year's Queen's Speech - no solution to [the row over holding terror suspects for] 42 days, still re-writing last year's Budget, whole bills, badly drafted still stuck in the House of Lords."

This is the Conservative Party so full of contradictions that they are unable to put forward a policy for the future of this country
Gordon Brown

He said the speech was about the "short term political survival" of the prime minister.

"After yesterday's U-turn, today's Queen's Speech is just another attempt to save the prime minister's skin and it won't wash. People can see a government, not just a prime minister, that has run out of road, run out of money, run out of ideas," Mr Cameron said.

Mr Brown said if he had followed the Conservatives' advice none of the major legislation going through the Commons this year - on energy, planning, ID cards and airports - would have gone through.

"If we had taken the advice of the Conservative Party, they would've put all the tax cuts into stamp duty on shares and into inheritance tax, instead of helping 22m people as we have done today," he said.

He accused Mr Cameron of voting against flexible working, opposing more banking regulation and opposing the minimum wage, tax credits and the new deal.

"This is the Conservative Party so full of contradictions that they are unable to put forward a policy for the future of this country."




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