BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Last Updated: Sunday, 30 December 2007, 17:29 GMT
Memorable moments: Politics in 2007
Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Nick Clegg

For Britain's politicians at Westminster it was a year that very nearly had it all - high drama, low comedy, spellbinding Commons performances, reversals of fortunes. A new prime minister. Another new Lib Dem leader. There wasn't a general election - but even that was a close-run thing.

So what were the highs and lows of the year? MPs we spoke to mentioned a range of moments, including Tony Blair's final Commons appearance in June - which ended with a rare standing ovation from all sides - and Vince Cable's jibe that Gordon Brown had gone from Stalin to Mr Bean.

Let us know what you think using the form at the bottom of this page. To help jog memories here are ten memorable moments of the political year 2007:

10 MAY - TONY BLAIR RESIGNS

Tony Blair in Sedgefield
"The British are special. The world knows it. In our innermost thoughts, we know it. This is the greatest nation on earth." Tony Blair rarely did things by half but his tearful farewell speech in his Sedgefield constituency, as he announced he was standing down as prime minister after 10 years, reached new heights of emotion or, for his critics, bombast.

27 JUNE: BLAIR'S FINAL COMMONS APPEARANCE

Tony Blair's final Commons appearance
It has never been Tony Blair's favourite arena - he even begins his final prime minister's questions by admitting he has "never pretended to be a great House of Commons man". But that does not stop him from paying tribute to the "noble" work of MPs before delivering his final ever words to Parliament: "That is that. The end." He is given a rare Commons standing ovation, and is cheered out of British politics after a decade in power.

27 JUNE: BROWN ENTERS DOWNING STREET

Gordon and Sarah Brown enter Downing Street
Gordon Brown achieves his lifelong ambition when he becomes prime minister. After "kissing hands" with the Queen at Buckingham Palace, he goes to Downing Street, standing nervously on the steps, wife Sarah at his side, to deliver his first words as PM. Reaching for his old school motto he promises to "do my utmost" before adding: "Let the work of change begin".

THE ELECTION THAT NEVER WAS

Over the summer, people close to the prime minister say he is thinking about holding an autumn election. Labour is ahead in the polls and Mr Brown is riding high. But then the Conservatives unveil a highly popular policy on inheritance tax. And the prime minister decides against holding a poll. The repercussions dominate the rest of the political year as the Tories regain their composure - and their lead in the polls.

10 OCTOBER: CAMERON TAUNTS 'BOTTLER BROWN'

David Cameron
The Conservatives ridicule Mr Brown for not holding an autumn election. They say no-one believes his decision was not influenced by bad opinion poll results for Labour. They call him "Bottler Brown". In the Commons, Tory leader David Cameron goes for the jugular, telling the prime minister: "Find a bit of bottle, get in your car, go down to Buckingham Palace and call that election".

15 OCTOBER: SIR MENZIES RESIGNS

Sir Menzies Campbell
Lib Dem leader Sir Menzies Campbell has, like everyone else, been gearing up for an autumn election but when it is called off, the next likely polling day suddenly seems very far away indeed. With the party performing poorly in the polls - and Sir Menzies facing constant criticism of his Commons performances - he decides to do the decent thing. He says he could not get the party's message out to the public because there was too much talk about his age.

27 NOVEMBER: BROWN ADMITS SECRET DONATIONS

David Abrahams
It emerges the Labour Party has accepted donations totalling more than 600,000 600 illegally. The money was given by North-East businessman David Abrahams (pictured) through intermediaries including his secretary and his solicitor. The police are investigating, and Labour's general secretary resigns. At his monthly news conference, Gordon Brown says the law has been broken.

27 NOVEMBER: CAMERON SAYS BROWN 'NOT UP TO JOB'

Gordon Brown
After it emerges Labour's accepted donations illegally, the Conservative leader David Cameron attacks the prime minister. In the Commons, David Cameron says there had been "disaster after disaster" since Mr Brown took over, and asks if he is "cut out for the job". Mr Brown says he had "no knowledge" of the nature of the donations. Mr Cameron says his explanation "beggars belief".

27 NOVEMBER: VINCE CABLE'S JOKE

Vince Cable
The Lib Dems' Acting Leader Vince Cable turns out to be quite a hit. People talk about him as the best leader the party never had. In the Commons, he mocks the prime minister over "dodgy donations" to Labour, the missing discs and the trouble at the Northern Rock bank. For many it is the political joke of the year - all the more devastating as the two men used to enjoy a friendly relationship, even co-authoring a book together.

18 DECEMBER: NICK CLEGG IS NEW LIB DEM LEADER

Nick Clegg
Forty-year-old former MEP Nick Clegg, who has been an MP for just over two years, becomes the Liberal Democrat's third leader in less than two years. He beats rival Chris Huhne by just 500 votes. Mr Clegg says he wants a "new beginning" for his party, which has been languishing all year in the opinion polls, and promises to listen more to voters' concerns.


Add your comments using the form below.

Name
Your e-mail address
Town/city and country
Your comment

The BBC may edit your comments and not all emails will be published. Your comments may be published on any BBC media worldwide.






FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific