[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Last Updated: Friday, 14 July 2006, 10:03 GMT 11:03 UK
Tebbit backs 'hug a hoodie' call
Lord Tebbit
Lord Tebbit has unexpectedly backed David Cameron
They may have had their differences, but Lord Tebbit appears to agree with David Cameron on one thing - young "hoodies" are a misunderstood breed.

Mr Cameron was mocked by Labour after saying young people needed "a lot more love" to avoid a life of crime.

He said teenagers who hide under hooded tops are trying to "blend in" rather than appear threatening.

Lord Tebbit - who once enjoyed the image of the Tories' hard man - said Mr Cameron was making an important point.

In an interview with the Tory Radio website, the peer, who has criticised the direction Mr Cameron is taking the Conservative Party, said he backed Mr Cameron's stance on youth crime.

"I think that although David Cameron is going to be dogged for years by the slogan 'hug a hoodie', there's something in what he was saying the other day which was extremely important," said Lord Tebbit.

"It's a question of what we do about it. Those kids, the hoodies and the others, on the streets, getting into trouble are there because of a break-up of families and lack of discipline in home and at school."

Hooded tops - known as hoodies - have come to be viewed by some as a symbol of social disorder.

Lord Tebbit also used the interview to say he regretted staying an extra night at the 1984 Tory conference.

On that extra night the IRA bombed the conference hotel and his wife, Margaret, was left paralysed.




SEE ALSO
Cameron defends 'hoodie' speech
10 Jul 06 |  UK Politics
Tebbit warns of Cameron dangers
12 Jan 06 |  UK Politics

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific