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Wednesday, June 9, 1999 Published at 14:54 GMT 15:54 UK


UK Politics

Campaign targets disabled discrimination

The posters are intended to be hard-hitting

The government has unveiled a series of posters aimed at curbing discrimination against people with disabilities.

Education and Employment Secretary David Blunkett, who is blind, revealed the posters, which will be displayed across the country.

The move is part of a 6m efforts to stop discrimination and promote equal opportunities.

One poster shows a young man in a wheelchair with a woman sitting on his lap.

The caption reads: "Sex can be a problem. Helen's a screamer."


[ image: The government wants to challenge perceptions about disabled people]
The government wants to challenge perceptions about disabled people
The campaign is backed by celebrities, including England football manager Kevin Keegan, and has financial support from a range of British businesses.

Kevin Keegan said: "We all have a part to play and I feel that it is important to encourage people to examine any prejudice that they have."

The employment secretary said: "Our campaign is about raising awareness of the contribution that people with disabilities can and do make at all levels of society and to encourage employers to play their part.

"A good deal of prejudice is unintentional. It is largely based on people's fear of the unknown."

He told the BBC: "What I'm really saying is that despite the enormous moves that are being made ... it is actually a change in attitude that is most important and it is reducing the fear and uncertainty that people feel and saying to employers for God's sake give someone a chance.

"It's a can-do message. Instead of looking at what people can't do we need to look at what they can do."



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