BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Politics  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 6 February, 2003, 10:24 GMT
Public sector 'to receive 3% pay rise'
Salary slip
Ministers will be concerned about industrial action
A union chief has described a reported pay award for hundreds of thousands of teachers, servicemen and civil servants as an "insult".

A pay rise of around 3% for public sector workers is to be recommended on Friday by independent salary review bodies, according to The Times.

The increase would apply to around 440,000 teachers and 205,500 members of the Armed Forces as well as senior civil servants and judges.

The government should have the courage to tackle the problem of teachers' pay

Doug McAvoy
The pay review bodies are expected to hand their recommendations to the government this month.

The suggested rises, which are said to hover around the inflation rate of 2.9%, are likely to spark anger among teachers, who have been calling for a 10% rise.

Discontent over pay has already resulted in walkouts by teachers in London, who say they cannot afford to live in the capital.

Doug McAvoy, general secretary of the National Union of Teachers, said an increase of 2.9% will "do nothing" to recruit and retain the staff needed to ensure high quality education for youngsters across the country.

Pressure

"The increasing dependence of the education service on unqualified people and transient teachers does not ensure a proper education for every child," he said.

If reports of a 2.9% rise were accurate, "it would be an insult to the enormous efforts every teacher makes", he said.

Doug McAvoy
McAvoy: Government is failing to address recruitment and retention problems
"The government should have the courage to tackle the problem of teachers' pay to ensure the profession can recruit the graduates we need, despite the high salaries available elsewhere in the economy," he said.

"The government is pressurising teachers by suggesting that their 56-hour working week can only be cut by foregoing a proper salary increase and enabling unqualified people to take their classes - that will be rejected by every teacher and every parent."

Members of the Armed Forces, many set to be deployed in the Gulf, are reported to be receiving a rise of just over 3%, while senior civil servants and judges will see salary rises of about 3%.

See also:

18 Oct 02 | Business
22 Jul 02 | Business
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


 E-mail this story to a friend



© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes