BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Politics  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Monday, 3 February, 2003, 18:17 GMT
At a glance: Report on weapons inspectors
Britain claims the UN inspectors have been obstructed
Downing Street has issued a report claiming that the UN weapons inspectors are being "deliberately hampered" in their work in Iraq and spied upon by the Iraqi secret police.

These are the main points from the report:

  • The 108 or so UN Weapons Inspectors in Iraq are vastly outnumbered by over 20,000 Iraqi Intelligence officers, bent on obstructing them. This is a ratio of 200:1.

  • The Iraqi regime has intensified efforts to hide documents and materials in places where they are unlikely to be found, such as private homes of low-level officials, universities, hospitals and even mosques.

  • This material is being moved constantly and those in whose homes it is concealed have been warned of serious consequences if it is discovered.

  • The Iraqis have installed surveillance equipment all over the hotels and offices that UN personnel are using. All their meetings are monitored, their relationships observed, their conversations listened to.

  • Telephone calls are monitored by Al-Mukhabarat, the main intelligence agency. Also the rooms where inspectors meet to co-ordinate activities are bugged.

  • The rooms where inspectors interview Iraqi scientists are also monitored by Iraqi intelligence and the interviewees are aware of this - and are therefore fearful of giving anything away.

  • Almost all guards, escorts and drivers dealing with the inspectors are also members of Al-Mukhabarat and keep tabs on the inspectors.

  • Journeys are monitored by security officers stationed on the route if they have prior intelligence. Any changes of destination are notified ahead by telephone or radio so that arrival is anticipated.

  • Al Mukhabarat have teams whose role is to organise car crashes to cause traffic jams if the inspectors suddenly change course towards a target the Iraqis wish to conceal.

  • The inspectors use sophisticated industrial technology to detect hidden Iraqi programmes but the Iraqis have access to the same technology and so can check that they are hiding chemicals or substances effectively.

  • The intelligence agencies try to put psychological pressure on the weapons inspectors. They find out their names and backgrounds, disrupt their work and try to intimidate them.

Key stories

Analysis

CLICKABLE GUIDE

BBC WORLD SERVICE

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
See also:

02 Feb 03 | Politics
02 Feb 03 | Middle East
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


 E-mail this story to a friend



© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes