BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
    You are in: UK: Politics  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
 Sunday, 22 December, 2002, 05:54 GMT
Jowell 'considering' Lotto takeover
Lotto balls
Money to good causes has fallen with ticket sales
The government could be prepared to nationalise the National Lottery, according to Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell.

In an interview with the Sunday Telegraph, said she was "seriously considering" bringing the Lotto under state control.

She said it was important to prevent money being "creamed off" by the firms running the game.

What matters about the lottery is that it works for the public good, that it represents good value for money and that the minimum amount of money is being creamed off to meet costs

Tessa Jowell
Culture Secretary
But National Lottery operator Camelot has vowed to resist any government moves to nationalise the multi-million pound game.

Lotto sales have been falling and therefore bringing in less money for good causes.

Referring to the option of nationalising the lottery, Ms Jowell told Telegraph: "I am very interested in exploring that possibility. We are seriously considering it.

"What matters about the lottery is that it works for the public good, that it represents good value for money and that the minimum amount of money is being creamed off to meet costs."

A spokeswoman for Camelot said: "We have always known it (state control) is an option and would set out our case as part of any review."

The National Lottery was launched in 1994 and its weekly draws were renamed Lotto in 2002, after sales fell for the third consecutive year.

'Obscene' bonuses

In 1996, Labour threatened to limit its profits amid controversy over what it described as "obscene" bonuses paid to Camelot executives.

The new operator licence was reissued to Camelot in 2001 after a protracted legal process.

The firm took its case to the High Court when the Lottery Commission initially favoured a rival bid from Richard Branson.

In April 2002, Camelot made a 72m gamble by having a huge advertising campaign headed by Billy Connolly and introducing new games.

But ticket sales have fallen by more than 5% since then.

  WATCH/LISTEN
  ON THIS STORY
  Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell
"We're looking at the potential for long-term change to the lottery"
See also:

26 Nov 02 | England
07 Oct 02 | England
29 Sep 02 | Business
14 Nov 01 | England
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


E-mail this story to a friend



© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes