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EDITIONS
 Tuesday, 17 December, 2002, 12:30 GMT
'Must do better', say transport experts
Motorway
Congestion targets will not be met

As the government admits shortcomings in how it is faring against targets set in its 10-year transport plan, three transport experts give BBC News Online their verdicts on Labour's performance so far.

Stephen Glaister, professor of transport and infrastructure at Imperial College, London:

"Even when the transport plan was brought out it was tremendously optimistic about the extent to which it could solve problems by putting money into public transport, while allowing traffic use to grow.

"There has been a failure to step back and say 'what would be the best way of spending the money?'

"What they have actually done is go down a rather political route by saying roads are bad, railways are good."


Edmund King, executive director of the RAC Foundation:

"There was a lot of optimism when Labour came to power that public transport would be the solution and there was more optimism towards motorists.

"But, despite promises things could only get better, they didn't.

"The motorist wasn't given an alternative form of transport and, at the same time, very little was invested into the network.

"It is hardly surprising congestion has got worse."


Steve Hounsham, spokesman for environmental pressure group Transport 2000:

"The 10-year-plan was always flawed and now it is in danger of grinding to a halt.

"Road-building won't work, the trains are in danger of running out of money and buses are not performing.

"But the situation can be turned around - the government must go back to basics and refocus its efforts on cutting traffic and bringing public transport up to standard.

"It should be no surprise the government's target to cut congestion will not be met - trying to build a way out of congestion is a complete dead end."

See also:

17 Dec 02 | Politics
11 Dec 02 | England
10 Dec 02 | England
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