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Friday, 23 August, 2002, 08:38 GMT 09:38 UK
Kashmir tops UK-India talks
Kashmiri militants
Kashmiri militants still cause disputes
The dispute over Kashmir and the campaign against international terrorism dominated talks between the UK foreign secretary and India's deputy prime minister.

Jack Straw and Lal Krishna Advani met in London on Thursday.

Agenda
Kashmir
Trade
Cooperation on education and science
Development aid
Mr Advani is also India's home secretary and met his UK counterpart, David Blunkett.

As well as discussing efforts to resolve India's dispute with Pakistan over Kashmir, Mr Advani talked about his country's growing links with the UK on issues like trade and development.

Mr Straw visited India and Pakistan earlier this year in an effort to calm tensions over Kashmir.

Terror training concern

The meeting lasted more than an hour but officials did not give details of the talks on Kashmir.

In a statement, Mr Straw said: "A key part of our discussion was the close cooperation we share with India on counter-terrorism.

"We also discussed the difficulties between India and Pakistan over Kashmir."

Ahead of the meeting, Mr Advani said attention so far had centred on attempts to prevent Kashmir rebels infiltrating the region from Pakistan.

He told BBC Radio 4's Today programme that he had been trying to stress to the US and UK particularly that Pakistan's President Musharraf's promise to stop such incursions tackled only part of the problem.

"There are other components which have not been addressed as yet, either by Pakistan itself or by the western countries," said Mr Advani.

Lal Krishni Advani
Advani says rebel incursions are only part of the problem
"They are the continued presence of training camps for terrorists, the supply of arms and ammunition to terrorists, the supply of funds to terrorists and their families and providing them asylum to come back from India to Pakistan."

About a million troops are lined along the India-Pakistan border as India continues to claim rebels are crossing into Indian-controlled Kashmir.

Pakistan instead says such infiltration has largely halted and accuses India of delaying new talks.

Cooperation

Elections are due in Kashmir in September and October and Mr Straw was expected to have urged Mr Advani to ensure there was a "good level of democracy" about the polls.

Other south Asia issues, such as the drive for peace in Sri Lanka, are also thought to have been to be discussed by the two ministers.

Many bilateral issues too were also expected to feature in the talks.

There are 1.3m British Indians living in the UK, says the Foreign Office, and links are growing between the two nations on trade, education, science and technology and development.

UK Prime Minister Tony Blair and his Indian counterpart Atal Behari Vajpayee signed the New Delhi Declaration in January, agreeing to strengthen cooperation on such issues.

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See also:

07 Jan 02 | South Asia
31 Jul 02 | South Asia
28 Jul 02 | South Asia
03 Jul 02 | South Asia
25 Jun 02 | South Asia
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