BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Politics  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 6 August, 2002, 08:18 GMT 09:18 UK
Campaign at a glance
Mast Sanity's campaign involved a range of tactics to get their view across, some of which are detailed below.
1. Once you have discovered a mast is going to be put up in your area, find out how the planning application is to be dealt with. Many phone masts are simply given permission as a matter of course by council planning departments.
2. If this is the case, you will need to get your local councillor to "call the application in" to ensure it appears on the council's agenda.
3. Get everyone in the area to write letters of objection to the council's planning department and to individual members of the planning committee. Point out concern over potential health risks and how the mast may affect property prices and quality of life in the area. Everyone should also object to the mobile phone operator.
4. Make lots of noise. Form an action group and make contact with a national campaign such as Mast Sanity. Contact your local newspaper, television and radio.
5. Organise a public meeting and, if possible, get your local MP to attend. Print up flyers detailing the application and decorate the area with posters protesting against the mast, with eye-catching slogans.
6. Get a copy of all the application documents from you local planning office.
7. Try to organise a protest on the day before the council meeting and get local media to attend.
8. Do not despair if the decision goes against you - there are other options. Don't take no for an answer.
9. One option is to apply for a judicial review of the council's decision in the High Court. Without legal aid, this can be very expensive, so speak to a solicitor first. But don't waste too much time; you will only have a few weeks to challenge the council's decision. If you do decide to go ahead with court action, there is usually somebody in the local community who will be eligible for legal aid, so you can bring the case in their name.
10. Even when a mast has been built all is not necessarily lost. It is possible to take the mobile phone operator to County Court under Schedule 2 of the 1984 Telecommunications Act. This is a relatively inexpensive option and has been successful in the past. You will need to prove that your property has been adversely affected by the mast. A third, less tried, method is to appeal to the Secretary of State for local government and planning, who has the final say in planning matters.

Send us your comments:
Name:

Your E-mail Address:


Country:

Comments:

Disclaimer: The BBC will put up as many of your comments as possible but we cannot guarantee that all e-mails will be published. The BBC reserves the right to edit comments that are published.



Heathrow campaign

Mobile phone masts
See also:

04 Mar 02 | Education
03 Apr 01 | Politics
11 Apr 02 | N Ireland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


E-mail this story to a friend



© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes