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Thursday, 1 August, 2002, 10:02 GMT 11:02 UK
Tebbit blasts Duncan Smith's Tories
Lord Tebbit
Norman Tebbit has warned Iain Duncan Smith to end the introspection of a twice-defeated Conservative Party and get on with the "red meat of politics".


The politically retarded managers at Central Office seem obsessed with the ethnic and sexual minorities

Lord Tebbit

The former Tory chairman also blasts the decision of foreign affairs spokesman Alan Duncan to come out as homosexual and attacks the "over excitable and scarcely rational children" in Conservative Central Office.

Writing in the Spectator magazine Lord Tebbit warns Mr Duncan Smith to avoid "minority-chasing tomfoolery".

The remarks are particularly significant as the Tory leader has always been backed by Mr Tebbit, whose Chingford parliamentary seat he inherited.

'Black lesbians'

Lord Tebbit writes of the current Tory regime: "It is their tactics and presentation which are plaguing the Tories and turning off the electors.

"Despite the ramblings and spoutings of the over excitable and scarcely rational children in Central office, the nation is not possessed by an overwhelming urge to fill the shadow Cabinet with 25-year-old black lesbians and homosexual, asylum-seeking Muslims.


The great mass of us have no desire to emulate Mr Duncan's activities under his duvet

Lord Tebbit

"Alan Duncan's totally unsurprising announcement that he is 'gay' has on them the impact of a powder puff flung at an elephant.

"Britain is a very tolerant country.

"The great mass of us have no desire to emulate Mr Duncan's activities under his duvet... we do not wish to join in; we just wish profoundly that he would not bore us with his sexual problems."

When he backed Mr Duncan Smith's leadership bid, Lord Tebbit described him as a "normal family man" which was taken to be an attack on rival Michael Portillo who had admitted to youthful homosexual experiences.

In the Spectator, Lord Tebbit goes on to write that during the 1980s electoral success for the Tories came about because most of the "socio-economic group C were committed to Conservative values but did not think of themselves as Conservatives".

Minority chasing?

"Never did we patronise voters or ask them to like us."

He adds: "The politically retarded managers at Central Office seem obsessed with the ethnic and sexual minorities, forgetting that those who share our values will come with us and those who don't will not."

Lord Tebbit also argues that the voting public are unconcerned whether former party chairman David Davis was sacked via mobile phone or whether the party has gay MPs.
Margaret Thatcher
Margaret Thatcher was the first female prime minister

He plays down the appointment of a female party chairman, Theresa May, pointing out there has been a woman on the throne for 50 years and the Tory party elected a woman leader, Margaret Thatcher, 27-years-ago.

"Such trivia masquerade as news even in serious newspapers only because there is so little else to write about the Conservative Party.

"The challenge for Iain Duncan Smith is to raise his game, end the petal-plucking 'they love us, they love us not' introspection of a twice-defeated party, and set out the red meat of politics - the principles and policies on which he would govern."

He adds: "Iain Duncan Smith has fewer than ten weeks to his party conference.

"If that is all tactics and minority-chasing tomfoolery, the Tories will cease to be a grown-up party."

See also:

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08 Nov 99 | Politics
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24 Jul 02 | Politics
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