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Tuesday, 28 May, 2002, 16:57 GMT 17:57 UK
Stephen Byers resignation: TV and Radio reports
Stephen Byers announcing his resignation
Transport Secretary Stephen Byers resigns from the government after months of sustained criticism, mainly over allegations that he deceived parliament.

BBC News Online looks at his resignation and the background to it.


Darling takes transport job
Alastair Darling arrives to start his new job at the Department of Transport
Alistair Darling succeeds Stephen Byers as transport secretary

Alistair Darling has replaced Stephen Byers as transport secretary following a minor cabinet reshuffle, held in the wake of Mr Byers' resignation. Mr Darling will only take over the transport side of Mr Byers' portfolio, while the regional aspects of the job will be given to Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott.



Resignation statement
Stephen Byers
Stephen Byers said he was not a liar

In his resignation statement, Stephen Byers admitted making mistakes but denied the often repeated opposition allegations that he was a liar who had misled parliament. He said he was resigning because the government he supported was being damaged as a result of his continuing presence in the cabinet.





The Sixsmith affair
Martin Sixsmith
Martin Sixsmith repeatedly contradicted Stephen Byers' version of events

Stephen Byers faced the greatest political pressure over allegations that he misled MPs over the departure of press advisers Jo Moore and Martin Sixsmith. On 26 February and again on 9 May he was obliged to come before MPs in the House of Commons with his account of a chain of events leading back to 11 September and Jo Moore's notorious e-mail saying it was a good day to bury bad news.




Winding up Railtrack
 Selby train crash
A series of fatal train crashes occurred in the period before Railtrack was put into administration

Stephen Byers' decision to put Railtrack into administration attracted immediate criticism from the Conservative opposition. But it was, again, allegations that Mr Byers had misled parliament which proved the most damaging. On 13 November 2001 he came to the House of Commons to defend his role.




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