BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in:  UK Politics
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Interviews 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
Sunday, 28 April, 2002, 14:14 GMT 15:14 UK
Q&A: Child benefit
Parents of unruly teenagers could have their child benefit taken away under new proposals to crack down on youth crime. BBC News Online explains what they stand to lose.

How much is child benefit?

Child benefit is 15.50 every week for a first-born child - except for lone parents, who receive 17.55.

For each subsequent child, there is an additional weekly payment of 10.55. The money is not taxed.

Who can receive it?

Available for every child in the UK below the age of 16, child benefit is paid to the parent directly responsible for care of the youngster.

Those in full-time education remain eligible until the age of 19, but the cut-off point for children registered for work or training is 18.

How many parents claim it?

Child benefit is taken up by nearly 100% of the eligible population.

What does it cost in total?

In 2000, more than 7bn was spent on child benefit.

Who pays for it?

It is funded by general taxation.

Why?

On the assumption the vast majority of the population will benefit from the money at some point.

It is seen as a economical because it avoids the expense of means testing.

What about those on higher incomes?

As it is tax free, child benefit is worth more to rich people on the higher tax band.

But it can count against poorer families as it is taken into account when calculating income support, housing benefit and other financial assistance.

Whose idea was that?

After World War II, bringing up several children was encouraged to restore the birth rate.

And in 1945 the Family Allowance was introduced provide benefit for second and subsequent children.

What about the first-borns?

In 1975, then Labour social affairs secretary Barbara Castle put forward the Child Benefit Act proposing additional benefit for the first child.

And between 1977 and 1979, child benefit replaced the Family Allowance and Child Tax Allowance.


Talking PointTALKING POINT
Parents of unruly teenagers could have their child benefit taken away - what do you think of the idea?Benefit threat
Is youth crime idea workable?
See also:

28 Apr 02 | UK Politics
Parents of tearaways could lose benefit
24 Apr 02 | UK Politics
Blair sets street crime deadline
16 Apr 02 | UK Politics
Blunkett targets young criminals
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK Politics stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK Politics stories