BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Politics  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Saturday, 16 March, 2002, 12:28 GMT
Downing Street denies hunting deal
Hare coursing
The Times suggested hare coursing would be banned
The government has denied it is working on a compromise deal to allow fox hunting to continue.

Downing Street dismissed a report that hare coursing would be banned but fox hunting allowed to continue as "speculation".

A spokesman said no decision would be taken before next week's vote on hunting in Parliament.

The Times said prime minister Tony Blair was set to back the plans by suggesting that hunting is as crucial to the countryside as pest control.

Fox hunting
MPs vote on fox hunting on Monday

The newspaper said hunts would be licensed for three years and a statutory authority, with the power to award and remove licences, set up to oversee them.

The BBC's political correspondent Guto Harri says a prominent figure in previous attempts to find a compromise was sceptical, telling BBC News that the report was "too good to be true".

Michael Foster, who promoted a private member's bill to outlaw hunting with hounds during the previous Parliament, also expressed surprise at the report.

Middle way

He said an inquiry by former civil service head of the Treasury Lord Burns had established both were equally cruel.

Monday's Commons vote gives MPs three choices - banning hunting altogether, allowing it to continue unchanged, and a third "middle way" that would allow it to continue under licence.

MPs are likely to vote for an outright ban.

The Bill moves to the Lords on Tuesday.

During the previous Parliament, peers voted to maintain the status quo.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Guto Harri
"Votes could swing in the House of Commons"
The BBC's Jake Lynch
"The revival of hunting was seen as a stick thrown to backbenchers"
Background and analysis of one of the most contentious issues in British politics

Latest stories

The Scottish ban

Analysis

Background

TALKING POINT
See also:

01 Mar 02 | UK Politics
28 Feb 02 | UK
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


E-mail this story to a friend



© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes