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Thursday, 24 January, 2002, 11:12 GMT
The Addis hospital row: At a glance
The row surrounding the hospital treatment of Rose Addis has seen two very different versions of events come into the spotlight.

On the one side the patient's family, the Evening Standard and the Conservatives say they were horrified by the treatment the 94-year-old received.

On the other, the Whittington Hospital, backed strongly by Prime Minister Tony Blair, insists she was cared for "promptly".

The two sides of the story are set out below.

 Family  Hospital
Speed of treatment:
Left unwashed and covered in blood for 72 hours.
Speed of treatment:
Cared for "promptly" with the wound cleaned and then given lunch.
Personal condition:
Left in the clothes she arrived in, with blood on her socks, in her hair and under her nails.
Personal condition:
The head wound continued to bleed after stitches had been given. Her face was washed, but as the wound needed to be kept dry her hair was not. The patient refused to let staff change her clothes.
Standard of care:
Not given a bed, and left in a room with two elderly male patients.
Standard of care:
Beds were available but A&E staff wanted to keep her under observation.
What the family says:
"My mother was crying and she hadn't been washed. She was sitting in a chair with the same trousers she had on on Sunday."
Mrs Addis's daughter Zena Gold.
What the hospital says:
"Mrs Addis was not left unwashed or caked in blood. Mrs Addis did refuse to allow staff to undress her until her daughter arrived."
Political verdict:
"If my poor mother had been a dog she would have been treated better."
Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith quoting in Parliament Mrs Addis's daughter.
Political verdict:
"To deride health staff publicly for a callousness of which they are innocent does real and lasting damage."
Tony Blair quoting in the Commons a letter from hospital staff to the London Evening Standard.

See also:

23 Jan 02 | UK Politics
Assinder's Question Time verdict
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