BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in: UK Politics
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Interviews 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
Monday, 24 December, 2001, 10:47 GMT
Euro view: Lord Heseltine
Lord Heseltine
By Lord Heseltine, former deputy prime minister

Joining the euro is the next logical step in the single market. It will give a great boost to our competitiveness in Europe and simplify transaction costs or avoid them.

In contrast, staying out deters inward investment, affects the City of London and leaves us out of the mainstream of European politics.

I would like to see a referendum as soon as it is practical to see that we can move forward.


We joined a much more enlightened and visionary concept of a united Europe

Michael Heseltine
It is perfectly possible to have a vote on the basis of the principle of joining and to leave the timing of entry to the government.

To win the referendum, we would have to persuade people that the world is shrinking, that sovereignty means a very different thing in the 21st century than it did in the 19th, that Britain's influence is more likely to be extended, that our friendship with America will be stronger and that the economic benefits are positive.

We have got to get off this business that we joined a free trade area. We didn't. We joined a much more enlightened and visionary concept of a united Europe.

The euro is part of the building blocks of that vision. We share environment policy, trade policy, defence policy and the single currency is now in the rest of Europe.

This government has got to get onto the front foot and make the case for entry. Its failure to do so is demoralising and it sends an unclear signal.

Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK Politics stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK Politics stories