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Sunday, 14 October, 2001, 15:13 GMT 16:13 UK
Tory grandee Lord Hailsham dies
Lord Hailsham
Lord Hailsham celebrated his 94th birthday on Tuesday
Former Lord Chancellor and Conservative government minister Lord Hailsham of St Marylebone has died at his London home, aged 94.

His son - Douglas Hogg - said his father had lost a long battle against illness.

"He had a very distinguished life. This is the end of a chapter - and it is very sad," said Mr Hogg.

Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith paid tribute to Lord Hailsham, describing him as "a superb Conservative politician, lawyer and statesman whose place in the Party and in national politics was unrivalled and whose counsels will be sorely missed".

Hogg with rosette
Winning the 1938 Oxford by-election

"Our thoughts and prayers are with his family this weekend," he added.

Lord Hailsham's career as both a politician and lawyer was long and eventful.

Lord Hailsham sat on the Woolsack in three Conservative governments, following in the footsteps of his father who was also Lord Chancellor.

He was renowned both for his command of English, and for his occasionally explosive temperament.

Former deputy prime minister Lord Heseltine said his Cabinet colleague had been a "giant of a man" who "dominated the political stage".

He told the BBC: "This was a man of huge experience and enormous opinion and a very exciting character to have around - a rather unpredictable character but that often goes with the quality of the man."

Hailsham at the podium
Lord Hailsham renouncing his peerage in 1963
As Quintin Hogg, he became a Conservative MP in 1938 and enjoyed a ministerial career spanning more than 40 years.

By 1963 he was Lord Hailsham but renounced his peerage in the hope of succeeding Harold Macmillan.

But despite of the support of the retiring prime minister, the Tories chose another former peer Sir Alec Douglas-Home.

Consolation came with the long period he spent as Lord Chancellor - the highest legal office in the land, which he vacated in his 80th year.

The current Lord Chancellor, Lord Irvine of Lairg, said: "Lord Hailsham transcended politics and the law as no modern Lord Chancellor has done.

"A characterful and combative politician, a powerful intellect and a strong advocate and judge, his breadth of achievement was remarkable."

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Huw Edwards
A look back at the long career of Lord Hailsham
See also:

14 Oct 01 | UK Politics
Tributes pour in for Lord Hailsham
14 Oct 01 | UK Politics
Lord Hailsham: The passionate peer
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